Around the Nation

By Lifson, Amy | Humanities, November/December 2002 | Go to article overview

Around the Nation


Lifson, Amy, Humanities


A ROUNDUP OF ACTIVITIES SPONSORED BY THE STATE HUMANITIES COUNCILS

ALABAMA

Three hundred years ago, the French established the settlement of Mobile. To mark the anniversary of Alabama's earliest European community, the Mobile Museum of Art is hosting "Picturing French Style: Three Hundred Years of Art and Fashion" through January 5. The exhibition features more than 130 works from collections around the world, from Degas to Dior.

ARIZONA

"Parched Arizona" programs are set for November and December in the aftermath of the fire this past summer that burned nearly 500,000 acres. "Given the lives and land affected, it is no exaggeration of say the Rodeo-Chediski fire was one of the most important events in Arizona history," says Dan Shilling, executive director of the state's humanities council. The council will provide speakers on ecological history, fire management, drought, and related topics at three sites: the Northern Arizona University/Yuma Campus, the public library in Parker, and Desert Foothills Library in Cave Creek. Each will include a three-week-long exhibition, "Moving Waters: The Colorado River and West."

Activities at the NAU/Yuma Student Union running through November 16 include a lecture by Jack August on the history of the Central Arizona Project and a video and discussion of Nova's "Fire Wars." Parker Public Library will host the exhibit from November 3 through 23, with an opening lecture by Mark Pry. The Desert Foothills Library will have the exhibit from December 8 through January 4. Doug Kupel will give the lecture, "Not A Drop To Drink," at the library on December 11.

GEORGIA

Arnold Rosenberg and John Lemley will discuss popular music tastes November 19 at "The Artful Interior" series at Rhodes Hall in Atlanta. Rosenberg and Lemley are hosts of music programs on public radio station WABE. Their discussion will focus on performers touring in Atlanta in the first quarter of the twentieth century.

A symposium November 15 and 16 at the Atlanta History Center focuses on race relations in the city in the early part of the twentieth century. It runs in conjunction with an exhibition, "Without Sanctuary: Lynchings in America," which will be at the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site through December.

HAWAII

A documentary on the life of hula master Margaret Maiki Aiu Lake, Aunti Maiki, will be shown November 14 at the Art Auditorium of the University of Hawai'i at Manoa in Honolulu. The film explores the cultural tradition surrounding the hula and the role that Aunti Maiki played in its reawakening.

An Untold Triumph: America's Filipino Soldiers, the story of a three-year secret mission in World War II, will premier at the Hawai'i International Film Festival on November 4. The film tells of the men of the 1st and 2nd Filipino Infantry Regiments under General Douglas MacArthur. They regrouped in Australia after the Japanese invasion of the Philippines and trained for the return invasion. By submarine they traveled back to the island and spied on Japanese ship and troop movements, laying the groundwork for the retaking of the Philippines in 1945. An Untold Triumph will be shown November 4 at Neil S. Blaisdell Center Concert Hall in Honolulu and in January at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

ILLINOIS

Women's Day 2002 at Oakton Community College on November 8 will focus on women in the arts and humanities and the impact of their creative pursuits on world culture. The day's schedule includes ten workshops.

The historical and literary foundations for the ballet The Nutcracker will be presented by Gwen Livingston Pokora at the Rock Island Public Library on November 9.

A screening of the documentary A Time for Honor will be held at Effingham High School on November 23. The film focuses on Vietnam veterans living in and around Effingham.

Photographs and oral histories of thirty-three farm women born before World War I will be presented by Terry Sheahan on November 24 at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle. …

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