Web 2.0 and Libraries: Impacts, Technologies and Trends

By Speisser, Nancy | Journal of the Medical Library Association, April 2012 | Go to article overview

Web 2.0 and Libraries: Impacts, Technologies and Trends


Speisser, Nancy, Journal of the Medical Library Association


Web 2.0 and Libraries: Impacts, Technologies and Trends. Edited by Dave Parkes and Geoff Walton. Oxford, UK: Chandos Publishing; 2010. 188 p. $75.00. ISBN: 978-1-84334-346-2.

Say "Web 2.0" and different images come to mind. Web 2.0 and Libraries is a collection of essays written by individuals whom the editors describe as experts in their fields. Two of the authors are identified specifically as librarians. The authors' specialties range from information science to learning technologies. Web 2.0 and Libraries is intended to provide a description of the current environment of Web 2.0. This includes the technologies - such as really simple syndication (RSS), blogs, wikis, open source software, video applications, and others - that are commonly associated with this term. The book describes how some of these technologies are used in library environments.

The book is organized into four distinct parts: place, people, technology, and conclusion. Except for the conclusion, the parts each consist of two chapters. Each section contains its own references, and the book provides a table of contents and an index. The authors and editors for Web 2.0 and Libraries reside in Great Britain, and the material in the book is based on their experiences in the British higher education environment. Although technology is technology, there seem to be enough differences in American and British higher education that American readers might have to stretch to apply the material. The content of the first three chapters is broad enough that it is easy to make the connection to American higher education. The middle chapters of the book (3, 4, and 5) discuss case studies about archiving pebble blogs, UK Web Focus blog, and risk assessment with a risks-andopporrunities framework that is provided to help readers analyze this aspect of initiating Web 2. …

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