Academic Partnerships and Key Leaders Emerging from Communities in the Lower Mississippi Delta (Lmd): A Community-Based Participatory Research Model

By Kennedy, Betty M.; Prewitt, T. Elaine et al. | Journal of Cultural Diversity, Fall 2011 | Go to article overview

Academic Partnerships and Key Leaders Emerging from Communities in the Lower Mississippi Delta (Lmd): A Community-Based Participatory Research Model


Kennedy, Betty M., Prewitt, T. Elaine, Strickland, Earline, Yadrick, Kathleen, Threadgill, Paula, Champagne, Catherine M., McGee, Bernestine B., McCabe-Sellers, Beverly, Bogle, Margaret L., Journal of Cultural Diversity


Abstract: Collaboratively, the nutritional health problems of the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) region were examined and opportunities identified for conducting research interventions. To combat the nutritional health problems in the LMD, community residents yielded to a more comprehensive and participatory approach known as community-based participatory research (CBPR). Community residents partnered with academic researchers and other organizational entities to improve the overall quality of diet and health in their respective communities using CBPR. The collaborative work in the LMD focused on interventions conducted in each of three specific communities across three states: Marvell, Arkansas (Marvell NIRI), and its surrounding public school district; Franklin Parish in Louisiana (Franklin NIRI); and the city of Hollandale, Mississippi (Hollandale NIRI). This paper examined some of the research interventions conducted in Franklin, Hollandale, and Marvell NIRI respectively, how leadership emerged from each of these communities, and lessons learned as a result of the CBPR model.

Key Words: Partnerships, Research Interventions, Rural Populations

Six academic and research partners in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, a local community and the cooperative extension service in eacn state, funded by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA-ARS), together comprised the Lower Mississippi Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative (Delta NIRI) consortium. Collaboratively, the Delta NIRI team examined the nutritional health problems of the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) region and identified opportunities for conducting research interventions. A further examination of each state noted above suggested an even greater need for research and interventions. For example, Mississippi has the highest rate of adult obesity in the nation, at 32.5 percent and the highest of overweight youths (ages 10-17) at 44.4 percent; Louisiana has the 8th highest rate of adult obesity in the nation, at 28.9 percent and the 7th highest of overweight youths (ages 10-17) at 35.9 percent; and Arkansas has the 10th highest rate of adult obesity in the nation, at 28.6 percent and the second highest of overweight youths (ages 10-17) at 37.5 percent according to a new report QuIy, 2009) by Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). In addition, the LMD region ranks near the top in cancer mortality, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (Stuff et al, 2004).

In order to address some of the nutritional health problems in the LMD, community residents yielded to a more comprehensive and participatory approach to research and interventions (Green, George, Daniel, et al., 1995; Israel, Schulz, Parker, & Becker, 1998; Israel, Schulz, Parker, et al., 2003; Israel, Eng, Schulz, & Parker, 2005; Minkler & Wallerstein, 2003; Schulz, Krieger, & Galea, 2002). This type of comprehensive and participatory approach to research and interventions is known as community-based participatory research (CBPR). Community residents partnered with academic researchers and other organizational entities to improve the overall quality of diet and health in their respective communities employing the (CBPR) model. The collaborative work in the LMD focused on interventions conducted in each of three specific communities across three states: Marvell, Arkansas (Marvell NIRI), and its surrounding public school district; Franklin Parish in Louisiana (Franklin NIRI); and the city of Hollandale, Mississippi (Hollandale NIRI). These communities were chosen because community leaders demonstrated high levels of enthusiasm towards the Delta NIRI program and community residents had previously demonstrated their ability to work together at improving their overall fitness and health (Core, 2006). This paper examined some of the research interventions conducted in Franklin, Hollandale, and Marvell NIRI respectively, how leadership emerged from each of these communities, and lessons learned as a result of the CBPR model. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Academic Partnerships and Key Leaders Emerging from Communities in the Lower Mississippi Delta (Lmd): A Community-Based Participatory Research Model
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.