Starring Role in Playoffs Is Payback for Zajac

Winnipeg Free Press, May 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

Starring Role in Playoffs Is Payback for Zajac


Sometimes it takes a big stage like the Stanley Cup Conference Finals to let the world in on a secret but the word is definitely out on Travis Zajac now.

The New Jersey Devils centreman is one of the most underrated players in the NHL but with six goals and five assists in 16 playoff games, including the game winner in Monday's 4-1 win over the New York Rangers, Zajac and his all around game are becoming more and more difficult to miss.

Zajac is top ten in the NHL in terms of defensive forwards and he's got a lot more offence than people give him credit for.

The 27-year-old is just entering his prime and ranks seventh in playoff scoring showcasing a game that demands he be considered for Canada's Olympic team down the road.

The Winnipeg native and son of Tom and Trish Zajac is a lot like Ryan Kesler in the way that he can skate, dominate in the faceoff circle and be used in a shutdown role against the NHL's best offensive players.

In reality, Zajac is best suited to be an elite No. 2 centre in the NHL but because of his chemistry with linemate and captain Zach Parise is slotted in the No. 1 role with the Devils. In 423 career NHL games Zajac has 91 goals and 164 assists for 255 points.

"Zach is a great guy to play with. We see the game the same way in that we like to forecheck hard and be aggressive. He's also a very strong two-way player and we feed off each other in that area of the game. It's fun to have an effect on the other team's offensive players," said Zajac, in a phone interview with the Free Press on Tuesday. "I've played with Zach a lot throughout my career and we've become good friends. He's great to play with."

There's so much to like about Zajac's game and he's a quality person that puts team first and elevates his teammates with both his play and his off-ice message.

This past season has been a little bit of heaven and hell for Zajac. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Starring Role in Playoffs Is Payback for Zajac
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.