The Sneden Saga Continues

By Kelly, James C. | The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Winter 1998 | Go to article overview

The Sneden Saga Continues


Kelly, James C., The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography


In 1994 a remarkable collection of some 400 watercolor views and maps of the Old Dominion during the Civil War came to light. The detailed watercolors, produced by Robert Knox Sneden (1832-1918), a topographical officer with the 40th New York, were pasted in four scrapbook albums that lay in a Connecticut bank vault for sixty years until the Virginia Historical Society acquired them through the beneficence of Richmond industrialist Floyd D. Gottwald.

Since then, the Society has mounted two Sneden exhibitions, one dealing with the burning of Hampton, the siege of Yorktown, and the battle of Williamsburg, and the other with the Seven Days' battles east of Richmond. Colonial Williamsburg ran a story on the fighting around Williamsburg that brought Sneden and his work to the attention of that magazine's national readership. The Huntington Library in California requested the loan of twelve watercolors for their 1996 exhibition "Images of Annihilation: Ruins of Civil War America." Sneden's drawings of the Fredericksburg campaign were exhibited at the Fredericksburg Area Museum and Cultural Center in 1997. The Chrysler Museum in Norfolk has scheduled a Sneden exhibition this spring, and the Danville Museum of Art and History will host one in the autumn.

At the same time that the Sneden collection was gaining statewide and national recognition, we were learning more about the man himself. Local newspaper coverage of the Society's first exhibition attracted the attention of a nearby Sneden relation. Dr. Albert Sneden, then interim associate dean of the College of Humanities and Sciences at Virginia Commonwealth University, made himself known to us. We located the Sneden Family Association, headquartered in New Jersey, which supplied a genealogy tracing the artist's ancestry back to Claes Sneden in New Amsterdam in 1657. An inquiry whether Snedens Landing along the Hudson had anything to do with our Sneden (who we knew was from New York City) led to ninety-sevenyear-old Alice Munro Haagensen of Palisades, New York. She explained Sneden's birth in Nova Scotia by showing that the lieutenant's grandfather had been a Loyalist who left New York City at the end of the Revolution But the real bombshell was her news that the great-grandson of Sneden's brother owned a 6,000-page diary of Sneden's Civil War experiences. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Sneden Saga Continues
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.