Remixing the Civil War: Meditations on the Sesquicentennial

By Hulbert, Matthew C. | The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, April 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

Remixing the Civil War: Meditations on the Sesquicentennial


Hulbert, Matthew C., The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography


Remixing the Civil War: Meditations on the Sesquicentennial * Edited by Thomas J. Brown * Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011 * xii, 238 pp. * $50.00 cloth; $25.00 paper

Beginning with editor Thomas J. Brown's reassessment of Robert Penn Warren's 1961 decree that the war constituted the "great single event of our history," Remixing the Civil War's eight contributors attempt to explore and "remix" how Americans remember the Civil War in settings and venues "beyond the framework of professional scholarship" (p. 2). Regardless of whether or not Warren's centennial dictum requires renovation as the sesquicentennial unfolds - and the jury seems split on the matter, as it probably was in 1961 - the book stands as an achievement of interdisciplinary collaboration among scholars of history, southern studies, art, and English. Nuanced interpretations of visual art, literature, reenactment, photography, poetry, and film collide to fashion an eye-opening, though sometimes eclectic, aggregate of high political meanings and even higher cultural significances rooted in late twentieth- and early rwenty-first-century representations of the Civil War.

The level of sophistication consistent throughout Remixing the Civil War is, to some extent, double-edged. On one hand, thoughtful contributions like Elizabeth Young's "Lincoln and the Civil War in Twenty-First-Century Photography" or Gerard Brown's "Reenactment and Relic: The Civil War in Contemporary Art" are not only absorbing but also connect the war, often provocatively, to current political events. Young probes the war's visual legacy to arrange an in-depth accounting of race in Civil War photography. Brown explores how memories of the war inform social and political issues ranging from America's War on Terror to gay culture and gender mores. To their credit, both authors push analysis of Civil War remembrance and the war's continued cultural traction past lines Warren never could have imagined possible in 1961. On the other hand, these essays, along with others, move rapidly through the channels of an unavoidably lofty and artistic intellectual realm - one that may occasionally prove inaccessible to general readers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Remixing the Civil War: Meditations on the Sesquicentennial
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.