A Health Literacy Model for Limited English Speaking Populations: Sources, Context, Process, and Outcomes

By Yip, Mei-Po | Contemporary Nurse : a Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession, February 2012 | Go to article overview

A Health Literacy Model for Limited English Speaking Populations: Sources, Context, Process, and Outcomes


Yip, Mei-Po, Contemporary Nurse : a Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession


Abstract

Health literacy is critical to effective communication between individuals and their health care providers. However there is little consistency in conceptualization and measure of health literacy. The objective of this review is to examine existing health literacy models and measures to assess their application to limited English proficient population in the context of information and communication technology. Communication platforms change with the development of new technology and existing health literacy models and measures are insufficient to capture the complex interaction that occurred in these communication platforms. A new health literacy model composed of four domains: sources, context, process, and outcome were introduced.

KEYWORDS: limited English proficiency; health literacy; Asian Americans

INTRODUCTION

Health literacy is fundamental to communication between individuals and their health care providers. With advances in information and communication technologies, the way in which health information is created and conveyed directly affects communication. A broader understanding is needed about when and where adults take action to locate, process, and act on health information. Reframing the concept of health literacy to better reflect the full array of literacy skills necessary to function in the current technological environment is particularly important for the growing number of residents in the US who speak little English.

Health literacy, as understood in the US, assumes that English is the primary language used by the individual and the health care system. As a result, language barriers increase difficulties with health literacy. Individuals with limited English proficiency (LEP) may be at greater risk for health problems because of their limited capacity to access, interpret, and use health information presented in English. Drawing on a review of the current literature on health literacy, with a sub-focus on LEP Asian Americans who may particularly have more specific problems in health literacy, this article proposes a new model to address the sources, processes, and outcomes of health literacy for LEP populations in the context of health information technology.

SOURCES OF HEALTH LITERACY AND HEALTH OUTCOMES

Health literacy is defined as 'the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions' (Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, 2004). It is typically recognized that health literacy is generative. Instead of remaining relatively stable over time, health literacy is dynamic, and the associated capacities evolve over the lifespan and are likely to be influenced by health-related, socioeconomic, psychosocial, and cultural factors (Baker, 2006; Derose & Baker, 2000; Zarcadoolas, Pleasant, & Greer, 2005). Core elements of health literacy that allow individuals to function in the health care system have moved beyond reading and numeracy to include a constellation of skills, such as critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, information seeking, and communication (Mancuso, 2009). The Institute of Medicine describes health literacy as the result of multiple, complex social and individual factors (Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, 2004). Individual factors may include education, culture, language, and communication skills. Social factors may consist of educational systems, health systems and the media.

Low health literacy impairs an individual's capacity to function in the contemporary health care environment, and particularly in the patient- physician encounter (Schillinger et al., 2003). Disparities in access to health information, services and technology due to low health literacy can result in less usage of preventive services, less knowledge of chronic disease management, higher rates of hospitalization, and poor self-rated health condition (Berkman et al. …

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