The Coming Global Nuclear Holocaust

By Demause, Lloyd | The Journal of Psychohistory, Summer 2012 | Go to article overview

The Coming Global Nuclear Holocaust


Demause, Lloyd, The Journal of Psychohistory


The Coming Global Nuclear Holocaust How the End Begins: The Road to Nuclear World War III. Ron Rosenbaum. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011. 320 pages. $28.00 (hardcover).

Rosenbaum begins his evidence for the inevitability of the coming nuclear Holocaust thirty years ago when Zbigniew Brzezinski was awakened by a warning that there was an incoming Soviet missile strike under way so he had to tell President Jimmy Carter that 2,200 Soviet missiles had been launched against the U.S. Brzezinksi had only one minute to decide to hesitate before starting WWIII, discovering that false U.S. training tapes had been mistakenly fed into his screen. Three years later, another technical error came in to the U.S. warning center indicating that a Soviet missile strike was under way; there was only a couple of minutes left in which to phone the Soviet premier and find out that it was a technical error.

Rosenbaum's evidence proliferates right up to the present time, when Obama has announced that it would produce ICBMs tipped with "highly lethal nonnuclear explosives" that will hit any place on earth within an hour when U.S. military ends deems them necessary, raising the question of whether these nations will trust the U.S. assurances that the missiles were in fact nonnuclear. Obama has flatly declared that "all ICBMs shall be on alert" at all times so he can launch a nuclear Holocaust without consulting Congress, especially against nuclear nations and terrorist groups, in order to continue the thousands of U.S. military bases around the world and carry out the vows of both Bushes that "the U.S. must stay on the offensive to rid the world of evil."1 Since the U.S. has 95% of the world's foreign military bases, it spends more than half the world's costs on its military, and since its bases stretch around the globe it is no surprise that "over the past two centuries the U.S. has attacked, invaded, policed, overthrown, or occupied sixty-two nations", for which their inhabitants in polls2 see the over a half million American troops as dangerous to them. This is particularly true of Obama's increased use of U.S. military in Pakistan, killing tens of thousands of innocent civilians, especially in his increase in drone attacks, famous for inflicting huge amounts of "collateral damage" on civilians.3 All this only proves my conclusion that America pursues its wars for provocation, not gain, and that nations that start wars are self-destructive.

In addition, Rosenbaum details all the other sources of fully independent missile personnel who are currently able to launch upon their own decision, such as nuclear bombers, submarine commanders and other missile personnel. Hundreds of military personnel are authorized to "launch missiles by pixel messages on a screen rather than unmistakable real missiles in the air, causing the launch of tens of thousands of missiles, many times over enough to destroy all life on earth. U.S. military today contains tens of thousands of personnel in over 7,000 bases around the world who can launch the final Holocaust missiles".4

Furthermore, purely offensive preemptive strikes rather than response to attack are now official U.S. policy against many non-nuclear nations, "rogue states" and terrorist groups. In addition, despite the U.S. Constitution, the President can launch a global nuclear Holocaust by himself, without Congressional authority; as Dick Cheney said, "The President can launch a devastating attack by himself. He doesn't have to consult anybody". Cheney's latest book stresses he had the power and inclination to start even more wars than just Iraq.5 President Truman not only ordered the dropping of nuclear bombs on two Japanese cities solely on his own initiative, he also ordered the Korean War without Congressional authority.6 American Presidents believe they can start wars by themselves, relying on Secretary of Defense McNamara's dicta that "We remain prepared to initiate the use of nuclear weapons by the decision of one person, the president. …

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