Ready to Read: A Multisensory Approach to Language-Based Comprehension Instruction

By Cheesman, Elaine A. | Perspectives on Language and Literacy, Summer 2011 | Go to article overview

Ready to Read: A Multisensory Approach to Language-Based Comprehension Instruction


Cheesman, Elaine A., Perspectives on Language and Literacy


Ready to Read: A Multisensory Approach to Language-Based Comprehension Instruction Mary Lupiani Farrell and Francie M. Matthews (2010) Paul H. Brookes Publishing. Paperback. 108 Pages. $24.95

One would not be out of line to wonder if it's even possible to get excited about another teacher resource on reading comprehension. After all, comprehending text for information or pleasure is the primary goal of reading, and the topic has been explored for decades. In this volume, though, the combined expertise of the authors, Mary Lupiani Farrell, Ph.D., and Francie M. Matthews, Ph.D., provides a link uniting research and practice in both written and language-based learning disorders. This slim, well-organized text is a much-needed resource for early career, veteran, and teacher educators alike.

The volume focuses on students with poor comprehension - individuals whose oral language problems interfere with their reading development. These students are often not readily noticed in the early elementary years because their comprehension is not primarily compromised by weaknesses in word recognition. Reading difficulties become apparent in about fourth grade, when comprehending more complex text becomes the emphasis of reading instruction.

The book begins with a concise and informative overview of the relationship between oral and written language and essential reading skills. Drs. Farrell and Matthews then succinctly describe three diagnostic labels associated with poor reading comprehension - dyslexia, specific language impairment, and language learning disability - and clarify the meaning and relationship of diagnostic labels used by different disciplines (e.g., speech-language-pathologists versus reading specialists).

To address individual students' needs, this volume uses case studies of three fifth-grade students who illustrate different learning profiles and school environments in which they are served. Although all three had difficulty learning to decode and spell, the students vary widely in their oral language ability and thus require different approaches in higher level reading instruction. Jim has strong oral language skills, but struggles to master the code of written English. His profile is typical among people with dyslexia - performance in listening comprehension is substantially better than reading comprehension. Like Jim, Billy also had difficulty learning to decode, but he also has subtle oral language difficulties that affect his reading comprehension. His profile fits the diagnostic label language learning disability. Cindy has persistent word decoding problems as well as multiple oral language problems, which together interfere with reading comprehension. Because instructional planning for higher level reading comprehension is heavily influenced by her moderate-to-severe oral language difficulty, the authors use the diagnostic label specific language impairment to illustrate her needs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Ready to Read: A Multisensory Approach to Language-Based Comprehension Instruction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.