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By Bartolotta, Christopher | Seton Hall Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations, Winter 2012 | Go to article overview

From the Editor's Desk


Bartolotta, Christopher, Seton Hall Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations


The upheavals that took the Middle East by storm are now well into their second year. The images of protesters in Tahrir Square influenced many scholars and pundits to claim these movements as a triumph of the people, and the birth of a vibrant democracy across the region. However, the transition has not been as quick or as clear cut as many had predicted. From the massive bloodshed that took place in Libya and which continues in Syria, to the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood, it has become clear that these uprisings have the potential to be hijacked by those who seek evil. The final chaper of these revolutions is yet to be writ, but what is clear is their unique dimension - the ability of people living under repressive governments to rise against them, and perhaps to inspire others to do the same.

To address the issues that these protests have raised, we are proud to present Beyond the Arab Spring: A New Era of Popuhr Sovereignty and Protest. The articles in this issue and the thinkers behind them will address the past, present, and future of the revolutions taking place across the Middle East, and the rest of the world. The Journal is pleased to feature a wide-ranging conversation with Yaron Brook and Elan Journo of the Ayn Rand Institute, who discuss the situation in the Middle East and how and why the U.S. should pursue a foreign policy based on reason, individual rights, and laisse^Jaire capitalism. Next, Amy Myers Jaffe and Keily Miller discuss another implication of the Arab Spring - oil - and how the protests taking place today may cause an oil crisis tomorrow. …

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