A Seat at the Table-Summary Results of the Financial Information Needs of Government Policy, Program and Operating Officials Survey

By David, Irwin T.; Ebberts, Ann et al. | The Journal of Government Financial Management, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

A Seat at the Table-Summary Results of the Financial Information Needs of Government Policy, Program and Operating Officials Survey


David, Irwin T., Ebberts, Ann, Bresnahan, Kenneth, Amin, Kimberly, The Journal of Government Financial Management


Policy, program and operating officials are the federal government's true financial managers. They lead and guide federal entities; establish policy direction; make budget decisions; support budget requests; make investment decisions; hire, fire, train and promote personnel; initiate or terminate programs; procure goods and services; and make the major decisions affecting the finances and performance of the federal entities for which they work.This premise has significant implications for the financial information needs of policy, program and operating officials and for the role of federal financial officials.1 Federal policy, program and operating officials and financial officials (and their staffs) require timely, accurate, reliable, consistent and useful financial information to make day-to-day operating, strategic, investment and policy decisions and actions. Unfortunately, such information is not routinely available. With that need in mind theAssociation of Government Accountants (AGA) and Government Executive magazine conducted a Survey of Financial Information Needs of Government Policy, Program and Operating Officials to better understand the type of financial information required by policy, program and operating personnel and to provide quantifiable data to assist them in getting this needed information.

More than 800 people completed the survey in the spring of 2002. The survey results provide a solid baseline to understand the current operating environment and the information needs of policy, program and operating officials, as well as financial officials, throughout the federal government. Major survey results, discussed more fully in this article, include the following insights:

* An overwhelming majority of respondents affirmed their need for budget-related information-what portion of available funds have been spent and how much is available to spend. As further discussed below, such information needs are an expected result of the federal funding process and the traditional focus on living within the budget.

* Interest in cost information-of services, products, programs, systems, performance measures, projects-is high. This is a recent phenomena for appropriation-funded agencies, but expected for those agencies funded by fees.

* Nonbudget financial information-- mostly balance sheet or financial condition-related-is important to a significant number of respondents.

* In general, respondents reported that financial information-both budget and nonbudget financial information-was not timely nor was it perceived to be accurate. This statement has major implications for financial systems developers and financial information providers.

* In general respondents do not use audited financial statement information, are not involved in the creation of such financial statements and are generally uninformed about audited financial statements.

* Comments from respondents reflect the significant differences in perception and use of financial information. Some respondents recognized the value of audited financial information but many more are not yet receiving the value of such information.

The survey results were first presented at the Association of Government Accountants' 51st Annual Professional Development Conference & Exposition in July 2002(2) and also incorporated in the article "Aiming for Accuracy" by Matthew Weinstock, published by Government Executive in July 2002.3 Visit the AGA website at www.agacgfn.org/ pdc/downloads/agagovexecsurvey.pdf to download a copy of the report. Detailed responses to survey questions will also be made available for follow-on research and for discussion in additional seminars.

Survey Results

Survey Respondent Demographics

The Survey of Financial Information Needs of Government Policy, Program and Operating Officials assumes that policy, program and operating officials are the true financial managers of the federal government. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Seat at the Table-Summary Results of the Financial Information Needs of Government Policy, Program and Operating Officials Survey
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.