Dr. James Zogby Speaks in Des Moines

By Gillespie, Michael | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, June/July 2012 | Go to article overview

Dr. James Zogby Speaks in Des Moines


Gillespie, Michael, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


During his March tour of Iowa, Dr. James Zogby, author, activist and founder/president of the Washington, DC-based Arab American Institute (AAI), spoke before a capacity audience in Waveland Hall at Plymouth Congregational Church in Des Moines on March 20.

"The winds of war are blowing," Zogby told more than a hundred listeners in a reference to the neoconservative campaign to foment war with Iran. "I think it's a little less likely than it was a couple of weeks ago. Some things have happened that have calmed things down, and that's a good thing, but nevertheless it's a danger that we will continue to face, and those who want war will not give up easily.

"There is a tragic irony in the war in Iraq that was supposed to secure an American century. That's what it was about. The Project for a New American Century (PNAC) said that we needed to display American power, to establish American hegemony that would last us for the rest of the century," said Zogby.

What PNAC argued was needed to combat the perceived danger associated with an emerging multi-polar world order was an overwhelming display of American force. The tragic irony is that the war, which was supposed to establish the American century, in fact did the opposite, declared Zogby.

"It leftus weak. It leftus less respected. It leftour army in a shambles, and we see one of the byproducts of that in this terrible atrocity that occurred in Afghanistan just a short while ago. I mean, four tours of duty? What the hell is that all about?" asked the author of Arab Voices: What Arabs are Saying to Us and Why it Matters (available from AET's Middle East bookstore).

Zogby told his audience that his office in the nation's capital is in the same building as a legal services agency for veterans. When he moved into the building in 1985, the agency's clients were homeless, mentally disturbed, and drug-addicted veterans of the Vietnam War. Today they are veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"These problems will be with us a long time," he lamented. These young men and women were sent to fight in wars we had no business being in because we did not understand what we were getting ourselves into. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dr. James Zogby Speaks in Des Moines
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.