Road across Canada Ends in Tofino on Vancouver Island, Locals Say

By Fuhrmann, Mike | The Canadian Press, July 29, 2012 | Go to article overview

Road across Canada Ends in Tofino on Vancouver Island, Locals Say


Fuhrmann, Mike, The Canadian Press


Road across Canada ends in Tofino, locals say

--

TOFINO, B.C. - The black-and-white sign in Tofino's harbour is a pretty low-key affair, an arched orca adding a decorative flourish at the top, but there's nothing modest about the statement it makes.

It's literally at the end of the road -- beyond it is the water's edge, a wooden wharf and the green mountainous backdrop of Meares Island in Clayoquot Sound.

That road stretches for some 8,000 kilometres to St. John's, N.L., at the other end of Canada.

The sign declares the spot on the west coast of Vancouver Island to be the "Pacific terminus" of the Trans-Canada Highway. Trouble is, it isn't -- at least, not officially.

As a Mile Zero sign emphatically states in Victoria at the southern point of the island, the highway ends -- or starts, depending on your point of view -- in the B.C. capital.

Tofino's sign is "patently wrong," says Calgary-based Mark Ruthenberg, who runs a Trans-Canada Highway website and has researched the cross-country network extensively.

"That's a municipal designation, not a federal or provincial designation. It's like a bakery saying 'we're the world's best bakery.' ... It doesn't really mean anything."

Ruthenberg notes there is no Trans-Canada Highway signage on any of the roads leading up to Tofino, which has a winter population of about 2,000 and a summer crowd of considerably more.

Fifty years ago -- on July 30, 1962 -- the Trans-Canada Highway was formally opened at Rogers Pass in southeastern British Columbia after the federal government, under the Trans-Canada Highway Act of 1949, had provided millions of dollars to the provinces to share construction costs. The project would later be finished in 1970 to become the largest national highway in the world.

Tofino first erected a sign declaring itself the western terminus of the yet-to-be built highway in the late 1930s or early '40s, says Ken Gibson, a former member of community's chamber of commerce and son of a former town mayor. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Road across Canada Ends in Tofino on Vancouver Island, Locals Say
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.