Devenir Infirmière En France, Une Histoire Atlantique? (1854-1938)

By Thifault, Marie-Claude | Nursing History Review, January 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Devenir Infirmière En France, Une Histoire Atlantique? (1854-1938)


Thifault, Marie-Claude, Nursing History Review


Devenir infirmière en France, une histoire atlantique? (1854-1938) By Évelyne Diebolt and Nicole Fouché (Paris, France: Éditions Publibook, Sciences Humaines et Sociales, 2011) (337 pages, euro27.55 paper)

The contours of the professionalization of women in the field of French nursing developed over the period between the Crimean War and the eve of World War II. The international dimensions of this history, written by Évelyne Diebolt and Nicole Fouché, reveal that the history of French nurses is clearly neglected by historians, especially by feminist historians. This is a historiographical gap that both authors try to cover in their book entitled Devenir infirmière en France, une histoire atlantique? [Becoming a Nurse in France: An Atlantic History?].

In this historical synthesis, Deibolt and Fouché collected, summarized, and prioritized all the work that has been done on nursing history in France. In addition, they extend their research to highlight the dynamics of the trilateral relations between Britain, United States, and France. Inspired by the paradigm of the "new Atlantic history" (p. 10), this book on the mobility and movement of female models confirms the importance of issues on both improvement and democratization in the world of French nursing practices in the face of the strong influence of an Anglo- American model. As well, this synthesis on the professionalization movement of French nurses gathers together the very rich research of Diebolt, among others, on women in health action, the Bordeaux Protestant House of Health, and her outstanding biographical dictionary on women activists.1 To this is added the research of the historian Fouché, in particular, on Franco-American relations.

Structuring the book are 11 chapters on transatlantic continuities and sequences that characterize the French professionalization of nursing over almost a century (1854-1938). The first three chapters-"Anticipation of the English Model," "American Nursing in the English School," and "Development of the American Model"-discuss systematically in some 20 pages the birth of the Florence Nightingale model, the first nursing model and the origin of major reform in British society. The pioneer activities of Nightingale in both thought and action form the point of departure in the history of mobility and interactivity of female role models. On the other side of the Atlantic, the influence of Nightingale is tangible because many schools of nursing in the United States were created by replicating the English prototype. Despite a slight time lag, the first generation of American nurses reformers followed this model until World War I, at least in the State of New York. The authors begin their analysis on the French situation in Chapter 4.

The chapters that follow, except for the last one entitled "Shared Feminism," engage the reader in an exciting analysis that showcases the complexity of the French model. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Devenir Infirmière En France, Une Histoire Atlantique? (1854-1938)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.