Life Story of Buddha Narrated

By Salman, Peerzada | Pakistan Historical Society. Journal of the Pakistan Historical Society, July 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

Life Story of Buddha Narrated


Salman, Peerzada, Pakistan Historical Society. Journal of the Pakistan Historical Society


Karachi, Jan 25: Gautama Buddha's life trajectory and Buddhism's spread to regions such as Japan was discussed by Dr Makin Khan during his lecture at the National Museum of Pakistan auditorium on Wednesday.

The talk titled 'Life story of Buddha interpreted in iconography of Gandhara Art and its extension to Japan' was organised to mark the 60th anniversary of Pakistan- Japan diplomatic relations by the Pakistan- Japan Cultural Association (Sindh) in collaboration with the Japan Cultural Centre of the consulate-general of Japan (Karachi) and the Sindh culture department.

Before the presentation, Dr Khan, a former director of the national museum, told the audience that out of the six great civilisations two (Indus Valley Civilisation and Buddhist Civilisation) originated in our part of the world.

With the help of a slideshow, he narrated the story of Buddha's life from the time he was born. He said Buddha was the son of a king, Suddhodana. When he was conceived, his mother, Queen Maya, dreamt about a white elephant. It was in 563BC that Buddha was born and named Siddhärtha. The child was made to undergo some rituals, including a bath with hot and cold water streams (these were shown in Gandhara iconography on the slides). The child returned to the palace and the king summoned a few nobles to examine him. One predicted that Siddhärtha would either be a world ruler or Buddha the enlightened one (and in the process achieve greatness).

Dr Khan said Siddhärtha was a precocious child. In school he asked questions which would pleasantly surprise his teachers. When he turned 16, his father wanted him to get married. For the purpose some girls were brought before him and he showed willingness to get married to Yasodhara. …

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