Reforming American Education: Videoconference Panel Considers Academic Excellence and Equity Vital to Democracy

By Morgan, Joan | Black Issues in Higher Education, March 5, 1998 | Go to article overview

Reforming American Education: Videoconference Panel Considers Academic Excellence and Equity Vital to Democracy


Morgan, Joan, Black Issues in Higher Education


Reforming American Education: Videoconference panel considers academic excellence and equity vital to democracy

Washington -- Just what is educational reform? National education standards? Equity of access? Teacher certification? Curriculum revision? Better governance? Moreover, do we really need to reconstruct our educational system?

These were concerns and questions considered by a panel of education experts along with an interactive audience in "Beyond the Dream X -- A Celebration of Black History." The live videoconference is an annual Black History Month tradition for Black Issues In Higher Education.

Before answering the question of whether the American education system needs reform, the moderator, Andrea Roane -- a news anchor at WUSA-TV in Washington, D.C., and a former teacher -- asked participating panelists just what the word "reform" means.

Dr. Michael Casserly, executive director of the Council of the Great City Schools, noted that everyone has different definitions of reform. His fellow panelists proved this point by offering definitions that ranged from classroom achievement and excellence to improved accessibility and community involvement -- all of which require reallocating resources and increasing participation by all parties.

"Ultimately, what education reform is about in this country is getting the institution of public education to work on behalf of kids and their achievement, and to put their learning as the first priority," Casserly said "It's about how do we arrange and structure an institution to do that."

Dr. Barbara A. Sizemore, dean of the school of education at DePaul University, added, "Reform means dealing with both excellence and equity.... But how you do it is what is under discussion. My view is that it has to take place in a classroom, because that is where the rubber hits the road."

U.S. Congressman Major Owens (D-N.Y.), who participated via telephone, said he dislikes the word "reform" because it implies that there is nothing redeeming about the current system. He prefers the word "improvement" because what is needed, in his view, is an "ongoing process of change involving governance, management, instruction, curriculum, and infrastructure. Everything is involved." Owens is a member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

Because assessment so often involves testing, Sizemore pointed out that the nation has a love-hate relationship with testing.

"Tests are here to stay," she said, "because they do what our culture wants and the best thing we can do for minorities is to help them pass and score, because it determines who will eat. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reforming American Education: Videoconference Panel Considers Academic Excellence and Equity Vital to Democracy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.