Perception of Top Management Executives towards Importance of EI for Professional Success

By Trehan, Daljit Rai; Shrivastav, U. S. S. | IUP Journal of Management Research, July 2012 | Go to article overview

Perception of Top Management Executives towards Importance of EI for Professional Success


Trehan, Daljit Rai, Shrivastav, U. S. S., IUP Journal of Management Research


Emotional Intelligence (EI) is the ability to identify our own feelings and those of others in order to motivate ourselves and manage emotions effectively in ourselves and others. Till recently, Intelligence Quotient (IQ) as a measure of excellence of capacities of the human mind, personality and technical expertise was considered essential for success in professional life. Of late, however, there is a growing realization that success takes more than these capabilities in the form of EI. Considering the present status of research on the subject, the paper presents a descriptive research to find out the importance of EI for professional success through a survey of the top management executives working in the manufacturing and services sectors, both in the government and private sector organizations in Delhi, Ghaziabad and Noida. Based on the statistical analysis of the data collected, EI was found to be important for the professional success of top management executives at 99% level of confidence for one-tailed test.

Introduction

Till recently, Intelligence Quotient (IQ) as a measure of excellence of capacities of the human mind, personality and technical expertise was considered essential for success in professional life. Of late, however, there is a growing realization that success takes more than these capabilities in the form of Emotional Intelligence (EI). EI is a relatively recent behavioral model, rising to prominence in 1995 with Goleman's (1995) bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ, followed by his another book (1998), Working with Emotional Intelligence. Goleman (1998) emphasizes that EI matters more than IQ and technical expertise in determining professional success in any discipline. There are adverse consequences to having low EI. This includes relationship problems, workplace rage, bad decisions, failure to advance in a career and poor physical and mental health.

For success in professional life and for performing various managerial roles and functions effectively, a manager is expected to excel in leadership, motivation, communication, decision making, interpersonal relations and change management. The study aims to find the importance of EI for these competencies and thereby, for success in professional life through a survey of top management executives working in the manufacturing and service sectors, both in the government and private sector organizations in Delhi, Ghaziabad and Noida.

Literature Review

Managerial Roles and Functions for Success in Professional Life

According to Koontz and O' Donnell (1972), in every organization, managers perform certain basic functions to achieve results. These functions have been broadly categorized as planning, organizing, staffing, directing (involves leadership, motivation, communication and supervision) and controlling.

To meet the many demands of performing these functions, managers assume multiple roles. Mintzberg (1973) has identified ten subroles classified under three main groups-Interpersonal, Informational and Decisional roles-common to the work of all managers.

Emotions

Emotions are intense feelings that are directed towards someone or something. Goleman (1995) refers to emotion as a feeling and its distinctive thoughts, psychological and biological states and range of propensities to act. There are hundreds of emotions along with their blends and variations like anger, anxiety, depression, disgust, embarrassment, enjoyment, fear, humiliation, sadness, shame and worry.

We have two minds, one that thinks and one that feels (rational mind and emotional mind). In most moments, these minds are exquisitely coordinated. But when passions surge, the emotional mind captures the upper hand and can paralyze the thinking brain. People's emotions are rarely put into words; more often they are expressed through cues.

Intellectual Intelligence

Intellectual intelligence (Intelligence Quotient, IQ) refers to cognitive abilities or intellectual abilities needed to perform mental activities for thinking, reasoning, and problem solving. …

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