Uncertain Times, Course Correction and Compromise

By Colbert, Louis | Aging Today, September/October 2012 | Go to article overview

Uncertain Times, Course Correction and Compromise


Colbert, Louis, Aging Today


This past summer's crazy temperature swings, storms and unpredictability have left many unsettled, literally and figuratively. But everything seems in a whirl of perpetual uncertainty these days: world markets are tumbling, healthcare reform-even in the wake of the June Supreme Court ruling- is teetering, job and financial security are hard to come by and the emotional barometer of the American people fluctuates, especially as the intensity of pre-election rhetoric continues to mount. In a few short months, post-election, the administration is likely to embark upon new leadership strategies and forge fresh directions that may bring back a bit of balance to the nation, and foster an atmosphere of collegiality and compromise.

Compromise: What Leaders Do

And as we head into November's presidential election, it is apropos that a portion of this Aging Today issue focuses on leadership and the core qualities of leaders-like the ability to compromise (as Ken Dychtwald writes on page 16, effective leaders should "be prepared to course correct .... This requires a willingness to ... adjust your orientation.")

With gracious assistance from Msgr. Charles Fahey (one of our most dedicated leaders in the aging arena, and a past ASA Board Chair), we procured a number of reflections on leadership, past and present, as it relates to the field of aging. ASA Board member Michael Hodin offers thoughts on global leadership; James Sykes outlines a model leadership program of citizen advocacy in Wisconsin; a conversation with past ASA Board Chair Robyn Golden yields insights on the "emotional intelligence quotient" of a good leader; and six graduates of ASA's new Leadership Academy and the longtime NVL program voice their perspectives on learning, leadership development and mentoring in the ever-shifting landscape of healthcare and aging. Mary Furlong also chimes in with how today's leaders can use the latest technology and social media outlets to acquire more knowledge- and share more influential thoughts and ideas.

Compromise-What ASA Will Not Do

Compromise, above, is used in the context of "making concessions" to reach resolution or agreement. …

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