The Latest on Data Sharing & Secure Cloud Computing

By Geoghegan, Susan | Law & Order, July 2012 | Go to article overview

The Latest on Data Sharing & Secure Cloud Computing


Geoghegan, Susan, Law & Order


Data sharing in real time.

The ability to share data across jurisdictional lines is critical to public safety. In the past, agencies and neighboring jurisdictions operating on disparate systems could not perform at peak level when responding to major incidents. With today's advanced interagency data sharing solutions, public safety agencies can effectively and securely share information in real time. The following companies offer flexible, integrated systems for maximum efficiency and interoperability.

1. CODY Systems

www.codysystems.com

Founded in 1979, CODY Systems is a leading provider of integrated singlesource software solutions and interoperable data-sharing interfaces to public safety and federal agencies. Over a decade ago, the company created COBRA(TM), a realtime cross-jurisdiction data sharing and analysis system that allows agencies functioning on divergent systems to quickly and securely share information. Since that time, COBRA has evolved into COBRA, net(TM), a disparate data source hub for multi-agency deployments, providing Web-based access to up-to-the-second real-time tactical information to officers at the desktop and in the field, as well as network-wide analysis to fusion centers.

COBRA.net is a suite of applications that links divergent databases (RMS, CAD, etc.) and, with active streaming, allows data synchronization within seconds after entry. Because each agency gets its own data silo, there is no commingling of data. Standards-compliant, the system works with NOEM, a federally supported government-wide initiative that allows the exchange of intergovernmental information, SOAP (Single Object Access Protocol), and other data sharing systems. COBRA, net's primary mission is to protect law enforcement agents in the field and inform investigators and analysts by delivering instant, real-time actionable information across jurisdictions and systems.

In early 2011, the Missouri Data Exchange Core Project (MoDEx) was initiated to create a flexible, state-wide information-sharing network for the state's public safety, law enforcement and homeland security agencies. Powered by COBRA.net, the MoDEx Core Project allows law enforcement agents to access real-time information on persons, vehicles, and incidents from a broad network of law enforcement RMS databases. COBRA.net provides a synchronized, centralized environment for shared information that is securely managed and maintained in its own segregated space.

Since the initiation of the MoDEx Core Project in the first quarter of 2011, over 100 partner agencies have been moved into live production. As of this writing, CODY and the State are continuing to bring more agencies online and are in the process of rolling out CODY's C.tac 5(TM) (COBRA.net Tactical) search application for access by MoDEx Core agencies. David N. Heffner, Vice President of CODY Systems, said that Missouri's growing MoDEx Core Project is a prime example of how a true partnership between a State agency and a technology provider can yield real, tangible results for disparate data source integration.

"The MoDEx Core Project is a great showcase for COBRA.net, especially the system's ability to break down the 'language barriers' between disparate RMS, CAD and other databases and provide seamless, transparent access to state-wide law enforcement data from many different tools, including our C.tac 5 Web-based one-stop search app. Missouri is a great partner and the project continues to grow as does our relationship," Heffner said.

The COBRA.net system provides instant one-stop searching of agency databases via a host of tools, including CODY's C.tac (COBRA tactical) application. Cloud-ready and fully browser-based, C.tac allows law enforcement agents to access information from all connected agencies' databases and other federal and state databases, such as NCIC. Deployed over a secure Internet cloud, C.tac is secure at the highest federal and state standards. …

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