Decolonzining Biblical Studies: A View from the Margins

By Bartholomew, Craig G. | Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, December 2002 | Go to article overview

Decolonzining Biblical Studies: A View from the Margins


Bartholomew, Craig G., Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society


Decolonizing Biblical Studies: A View from the Margins. By Fernando F. Segovia. Maryknoll: Orbis, 2000, 177 pp., $24.00 paper.

It is well known that biblical studies is in a state of flux and pluralism. What is far less clear is how to understand this flux and what to do about it. In this book Segovia brings together eight essays that articulate the different and competing paradigms in biblical studies today, and recommend a postcolonial approach as a viable and creative way forward.

On the whole the essays hang together well. Segovia's style is lucid and clear throughout, and this is no mean achievement considering the complexity of the topics he examines. The result is a stimulating book, full of insights, giving a good idea of a direction that biblical studies could take. There is also a sustained focus on pedagogy and biblical studies, which is an important but much neglected area.

In Part 1 Segovia discerns four main competing interpretive paradigms in biblical studies today: historical criticism, literary criticism, cultural criticism, and cultural studies. "Cultural studies" represents an emerging fourth paradigm, which takes the flesh-and-blood reader seriously and stresses the nature of all interpretation as construct. This paradigm opens the way to taking social location and colonialism seriously and is Segovia's preferred approach, although he regards the diverse approaches as not mutually exclusive.

In Part 2 Segovia examines the pedagogical discourse that accompanies the different paradigms, using Fitzmyer as his example for historical criticism, Powell for literary criticism, Malina for cultural criticism, and a variety of proposals for cultural studies. Part 3 discusses postcolonial studies and biblical studies, in which Segovia explains why he favors a postcolonial approach even though he insists that it is one among others. The two essays in Part 4 are less integral to the book, but interesting for their somewhat autobiographical and occasional nature. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Decolonzining Biblical Studies: A View from the Margins
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.