Linguistics and Exegesis in the Gospel of Mark: Application of a Case Frame Analysis and Lexicon

By Wong, Simon S. M. | Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, December 2002 | Go to article overview

Linguistics and Exegesis in the Gospel of Mark: Application of a Case Frame Analysis and Lexicon


Wong, Simon S. M., Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society


(ProQuest Information and Learning: Foreign text omitted.)

Linguistics and Exegesis in the Gospel of Mark: Application of a Case Frame Analysis and Lexicon. By Paul L. Danove. JSNTSup 218. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2001, 248 pp., $82.50.

Written by Professor Danove of Villanova University, this monograph is one of his many attempts to apply Constructional Grammar to the analysis of the NT text. The seven chapters of the book may be divided into two parts (chaps. 1-2, 7, and chaps. 3-- 6), which probably reflects more my understanding of its layout than that of the original author.

The first two chapters describe the methodology involved, Constructional Grammar, which is basically a further development of Case Theory, first theorized by the renowned American linguist Charles Fillmore in the 1960s. Different from classical transformational grammars which often assume an abstract deeper structure to an observable surface structure, Constructional Grammar (as representative of a nontransformational trend) accounts for linguistic relationships through the concrete, observable constituents of the sentences. "Constructional Grammar describes the grammar of a language in terms of grammatical constructions that identify a particular set of sentence elements and detail the syntactic and semantic constraints on these elements" (p. 16).

In his model, Danove employs three levels of analysis to Greek verbs (including a predicator such as ... and prepositions in the Gospel of Mark. Syntactic analysis describes the number of mandatory constituents (called "arguments") and optional constituents (called "adjuncts") required by a predicator. Semantic analysis describes the semantic roles (sometimes called thematic roles or semantic cases/functions) that "arguments play in representing the state of affairs designated by a predicator" (p. 21); accordingly, a set of 27 well-defined roles, with illustrations from the Marcan text, are utilized for this level of characterization (pp. 30-45). Lexical analysis describes how each constituent is realized lexically and is labeled according to traditional categories, such as Noun and noun phrases), Prepositional phrases), Adverb and adverbial phrases), and ADJ(ective and adjectival phrases). All these analyses are represented through a framework (called a Valence Description), which shows the attributes "of the possible arguments and adjuncts that can be placed in a dependency relationship to that predicator" (p. 20). Chapter 7 entitled "Lexicon and Parsing Guide" accumulates the results of all the analyses with classification. In essence, these 90 pages serve well as a reference to the semantic mapping of the predicator-argument relationship in the Gospel of Mark.

The second part (chaps. 3-6) demonstrates the application of such analysis to the Gospel of Mark. Chapter 6 addresses the general contributions of the lexicon and parsing guide. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Linguistics and Exegesis in the Gospel of Mark: Application of a Case Frame Analysis and Lexicon
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.