Lougheed Helped Save Canada's Democracy

By Green, Sid | Winnipeg Free Press, September 18, 2012 | Go to article overview

Lougheed Helped Save Canada's Democracy


Green, Sid, Winnipeg Free Press


I knew the late Peter Lougheed. As a matter of fact I can truthfully name-drop and say I had something more than a remote relationship with the late distinguished former premier of Alberta.

The last time I saw Lougheed was in the early 2000s at the Butchart Gardens Restaurant on Vancouver Island. I was being hosted at a birthday dinner by my daughter and son-in-law. By sheer coincidence, Lougheed and his party were at an adjacent table and my hosts were visibly impressed when he recognized me and gave me a warm greeting.

We spent more than a few minutes recalling old times. I had attended several federal-provincial conferences where he had been present, and we did get to know each other. In particular, I filled in for Ed Schreyer at a premiers' meeting, and it was this particular meeting that was the basis of most of our chit-chat at the dinner party.

Lougheed jokingly remarked that he and I monopolized the discussion at the meeting. This was his polite and subtle way of reminding me that I talked too much. Knowing myself, this was probably true.

Peter Lougheed was elected leader of the Alberta Conservatives and to the Alberta legislature in 1967. I was elected to the Manitoba legislature in 1966 and became a cabinet minister in 1969. Lougheed became Alberta's premier in 1971. Chronologically, we were contemporaries in Canadian politics until 1981 when the electorate ousted me.

Although Lougheed's accomplishments make mine appear rather picayune, there are some historical parallels and anecdotes that are worth mentioning. When I ran for the leadership of the New Democratic Party in 1968, my slogan was one word: NOW. My posters did not even contain my name -- simply the word NOW on a bright green background.

When Lougheed contended for power in 1971, his message to the people of Alberta was one word: NOW. Lougheed was successful and political commentators praised his slogan as a work of genius. I lost my battle by 28 votes and nobody remembers what my slogan was. The measure of genius is success.

An important issue in which Lougheed and I found ourselves at odds was the National Energy Policy. Lougheed defended the right of Alberta to get a world price for oil that was being sold to the eastern provinces. The world price at the time was being inflated by the oil-producing companies in the Middle East. Oil that had been sold for $2.75 a barrel suddenly skyrocketed to over $8 per barrel. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lougheed Helped Save Canada's Democracy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.