Motivation as a Tool for Effective Staff Productivity in the Public Sector: A Case Study of Raw Materials Research and Development Council of Nigeria

By Syed, Anwar Ali Shah G.; Anka, Lawal Muhammad et al. | Asian Social Science, September 2012 | Go to article overview

Motivation as a Tool for Effective Staff Productivity in the Public Sector: A Case Study of Raw Materials Research and Development Council of Nigeria


Syed, Anwar Ali Shah G., Anka, Lawal Muhammad, Jamali, Muhammad Bachal, Shaikh, F. M., Asian Social Science


Abstract

The study examined the views of junior and senior staffof Raw Materials Research and Development Council (RMRDC), Nigeria concerning motivation as a tool for enhancing productivity. To achieve this, the study examined how employees could be motivated so as to achieve desired objectives. The research is based on information obtained from available records, personal observation and interview conducted. The major conclusions drawn from this research were survey results revealed that 26 (39.3%) of the respondents are satisfied with their jobs, while majority of them 40 (50.6%) are not satisfied with their jobs. Respondents opinion regarding mode of promotion in the organisation revealed that 44 (66.6%) are satisfied while 20 (30.3%) are not satisfied with the entire process. Perception of respondents in relation to what actually motivate them to do their best to enhance productivity the results conclude that 20 (30.3%) prefer job security, 16 (24.2%) accepted in service training while 12 (18.1%) and 18 (27.2) prefer improved salary and promotion as factors that can motivate employees to perform their duties. Finally, the above results conclude that the Management of RMRDC did not motivate its staffto achieve productivity, efficiency and effectiveness. Therefore Null Hypotheses H^sub o^ is accepted and Alternate Hypotheses H^sub A^ is rejected. It is recommended that appropriate managerial actions must therefore be taken by the organisation that is motivation of the workforce.

Keywords: motivation, tool, staffproductivity

1. Introduction

The word motivation is derived from a Latin word Move in its meaning move in its simplest term. The term may be defined as the state or condition of being induced to do something. The need to increase productivity and efficiency in the work place of any organisation has led to increasing academic interest in the area of motivation over the years. Writers have been keenly interested in knowing what factors are responsible for stimulating the ability to work. Thus motivation has become an issue of concern for both scholars and practitioners of public administration (Anka, 1992).

Every organisation either public or private is goal oriented and all efforts are geared towards the successful attainment of those goals and objectives. Therefore, for any organisation to record any degree of meaningful success in the pursuit of its goals and aspirations, it must have the ability to create values (motivation) enough to compensate for the burden imposed upon employees. Such value or motivators can come in the form of good training policies, facilities or incentives such as fringe benefits, promotions, status symbol etc so as to satisfy the needs of the employees for enhanced performance (Adi, 2000).

It was argued and proved that unless individual employees are motivated to make efficient use of the potentials found in them during the employment process, they may not achieve the level of performance that is desired from them (Rothberg, 2005).

For an employee to be motivated, he or she perceived that their want are being met. Thus, the satisfaction of the employee represents an indispensable dimension of the motivational process. A satisfied individual would certainly contribute positively to the realisation of organisational goals and objectives, while a dissatisfied employee may not only contribute but can even act in such a way that the realisation of such goals and objectives could be completely destroyed. This underlines the importance of employees' satisfaction to the organisation (Anka, 1988).

It is generally believed that incentives such as good pay, good condition of service, provision of decent accommodation, opportunity for staffto undergo in service training etc motivates employees in order to increase their productive capacity. In view of the above, incentives are regarded as the major factor which motivates employees to exhibit better performance (Oshagbemi and Ocholi, 2006). …

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