Cities of Ladies: Beguine Communities in the Medieval Low Countries, 1200-1565

By Suydam, Mary | The Catholic Historical Review, October 2002 | Go to article overview

Cities of Ladies: Beguine Communities in the Medieval Low Countries, 1200-1565


Suydam, Mary, The Catholic Historical Review


Cities of Ladies. Beguine Communities in the Medieval Low Countries, 1200-1565. By Walter Simons. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 2001. Pp. xv, 335. $65.00.)

One of the most intriguing religious movements of the European Middle Ages was that of the beguines: women who lived together, had religious vocations, nursed the ill and dying, but were not nuns and did not live sequestered in convents. Instead, beguines lived by the work of their hands in "cities of ladies": communities generally situated in the hearts of the urban landscapes of the medieval Low Countries. There has been a wealth of new research on beguines since the last major English work on beguines was published in 1954 (Ernest McDonnell's The Beguines and Beghards in Medieval Culture: With Special Emphasis on the Belgian Scene). Walter Simons' Cities of Ladies brings scholars up to date and provides a framework within which to understand this complex phenomenon.

Simons concentrates upon two facets of the beguine movement: the religious status and gender of its participants. First and foremost, the beguine movement was propelled by lay people; beguines never took permanent vows of chastity, obedience, and poverty. Secondly, female lay people defined this movement from its inception. Simons believes that these characteristics define and explain much of its subsequent history.

Simons dismisses the theory that beguines were women who aspired to be nuns but could not, either because they were not patrician or because many reform religious orders stopped admitting women after 1200. He also refutes the argument that a surplus of women overwhelming northern European cities exhausted available religious or marital resources. According to Simons, beguine documents indicate that they sought to avoid marriage and helped others to do likewise. Moreover, few beguines ever became nuns even when they had the opportunity. Simons argues that beguines pursued a vocation different from that offered by either marriage or the convent: the ability to earn one's own living while caring for the disadvantaged "in the world" rather than sequestered from it. …

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