Your Gold Standard

By White, Constance C. R. | Essence, October 2012 | Go to article overview

Your Gold Standard


White, Constance C. R., Essence


You were probably among the millions who cheered on Gabbulous as she blazed to gold in the gymnastics team competition and took the women's all-round title as well. She wasn't alone. At this year's Olympics in London, African-American women brought home more individual and team gold medals than at any other Olympics in history.

We've come a long way since 1932, when Black American track and field athletes Louise Stokes and Tidye Pickett qualified for the Olympics in Los Angeles but were denied the chance to compete because of their race. Eight decades later, four African-American women burned up the track to win the 4x100 meter relay, shattering a world record that had stood for 27 years. The next day, African-American women prevailed in the 4x400 meter relay as well.

I was privileged to be in London as Gabby Douglas, Brittney Reese, Sanya Richards-Ross, SerenaWilliams,Allyson Felix and Claressa Shields all won individual gold medals. It's indescribable, the pride and excitement I felt being in the stands, watching these Black women put their conditioned bodies and well-honed mental skills in motion. I had goose bumps as people from all nations united to cheer Richards-Ross as she fiawlesslyexecuted her race. Carmelita Jeter's silver medal in the 100 meter was just as thrilling (she was edged out by another inspiring Black woman, Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce). I jumped out of my seat again and again, screaming cheers as Candace Parker, Maya Moore, Tina Charles and their talented USA women's basketball teammates scored unbelievable shots to pull ahead of Australia and win a tough game on their way to gold.

One definition of beauty is "the quality or aggregate of qualities in a person orthingthat gives pleasure to the senses or pleasurably exalts the mind or spirit. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Your Gold Standard
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.