LIVING THE EDGES: A Disabled Women's Reader

By Crane, Connie Jeske | Herizons, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

LIVING THE EDGES: A Disabled Women's Reader


Crane, Connie Jeske, Herizons


LIVING THE EDGES A Disabled Women's Reader EDITED BY DIANE DRIEDGER Inanna Publications

This is not an easy book to read. Throughout this "vehicle for women with disabilities to share experiences" you hit bald and uncomfortable truths - women with disabilities face disproportionate rates of violence, sexual abuse, poverty and unfair treatment at work and in medical settings.

A memorable contributor. Aboriginal writer Joy Asham, relates nurses' "terrible rudeness" to her after she had a nasty scooter spill on an icy road in Thunder Bay, Ontario. "I never received care when I was in hospital, couldn't even get a nurse to tighten my sling. My doctor would come everyday, but that was for five minutes. The rest of the time ... I was subjected to such terrible rudeness that all I could think of was going home and hiding, pain, sickness or not." Asham says one nurse told her, "Comb your hair right now!! If it isn't combed by the time I get back, I will take my scissors and cut it all off!"

This volume, which editor Diane Driedger says is the first Canadian work of its kind, reveals common themes (being outside the norm, countless challenges and barriers) and the experience of women living with a range of disabilities, including multiple sclerosis, Chrohn's disease, bipolar disorder, dyslexia, blindness and hoarding. …

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