Turning the Page on Brain Injuries

By Campbell, Tim | Winnipeg Free Press, October 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Turning the Page on Brain Injuries


Campbell, Tim, Winnipeg Free Press


Book discusses treatment, prevention of concussions

Another resource for concussion information is in play, this time from two hockey players who have lived through the dark side of their brain trauma.

Concussed! Sports-related Head Injuries; Prevention, Coping and Real Stories, ($19.95, Over Time Books) is now on bookshelves in Canada, authored by 54-year-old Winnipeg native Kerry Goulet and former Philadelphia Flyers captain Keith Primeau, now 40.

It's the product of the duo that began www.stopconcussions.com and the local launch Thursday at the University of Winnipeg was supported by the likes of Dr. Glen Bergeron, associate dean of U of W's faculty of kinesiology and founder of the school's Heads Up concussion institute, Dr. Anthony Kaufmann, neurosurgeon and director of the University of Manitoba's Centre for Cranial Nerve Disorders.

"There aren't a lot of books, Canadian-written books, on concussions on the shelves and we realized that not everybody's savvy with the Internet," said Goulet, the former MJHL player who spent 16 years starring as a player, coach and manager in German professional leagues.

"A story that hits home, part of why we did this book, is about Vic Hadfield. His grandson was injured with a concussion. The boy wasn't getting better. (He was) allowed to go back a bit early and got concussed again. They weren't that savvy with the Internet so they reached out to Ron Ellis, who's on the board with us for the Stopconcussion Foundation, and asked if he could get Keith or Kerry to talk to him.

"Vic called and we explained to him what his grandson Victor was going through and it really helped him understand that we had information he couldn't collect on the Internet."

Primeau, who retired after 909 NHL games and a fourth serious concussion episode in 2006, said it's a continued labour of love for him.

"It's a continuation of the work we've done with stopconcussions. …

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