Correctional Treatment: Developing a Successful Program

By Wagner, Wesley | American Jails, September/October 2012 | Go to article overview

Correctional Treatment: Developing a Successful Program


Wagner, Wesley, American Jails


Unless a paroled person commits a terrible crime or a news article reports the possible early release of a number of convicted felons because of overcrowding, correctional treatment is not discussed beyond the world of corrections or criminal justice. For the majority of people, corrections is an "out of sight, out of mind" or "as long as it is not in my back yard" topic. This should not be the case. Because the vast majority of people whom we send to correctional facilities ultimately return to their communities, it should be everyone's concern. The correctional treatment that offenders receive during their incarceration determines how productive they will be as members of society or whether they become part of the high recidivism rate. This article discusses correctional treatment programs that are being used in correctional facilities and whether they help inmates become better individuals.

Barriers to Implementation

Change is a constant in everyone's life. This is especially true in correctional treatment programs - after all, their goal is to change an offender's life habits. However, this change can also affect the work assignments of correctional staff and the manner in which they perform their duties. To understand this process, correctional staff must look at their own lives, recall how hard it is to initiate change, and be willing to be part of that change (La tessa, 2004). This is the first step toward successful change for both inmates and staff.

Before a correctional treatment program is implemented, it must be approved by the facility's administration. Not only does the evidence-based practice on which it is based need to be explained, but the administration has to know how the program will work and how the outcome is better for society (La tessa, 2004). Even though policymakers maintain a tough stance on crime, public opinion still strongly supports effective offender rehabilitation programs. However, the public also wants a tough stance on crime; therefore, rehabilitation programs must not appear to have a soft approach to crime (La tessa, 2004).

One of the most common difficulties encountered when initiating change is the lack of information communicated to line staff. To encourage a positive response, the presentation of a new treatment program must show staff how the program will improve the safety and security of the institution and the role they will play in the success of the program (Latessa, 2004).

Leadership is another key component in the implementation of a successful correctional treatment program. Because they are the ones who manage programs on a daily basis, frontline supervisors must be directly involved in the program - from the developmental stage through implementation (Latessa, 2004). When supervisors have an important role in a treatment program, they can demonstrate to staff how the program should be managed.

Risk Factors

Risk factors are the most important consideration for a correctional agency when looking at ways to develop successful treatment programs. Different risk factors have different effects and each is treated differently. Risk factors that most classification tools consider are:

* Static. These are factors in an offender's past that cannot be changed. They can predict the likelihood that an individual will recidivate. Some examples of these factors are age, previous convictions (both type and frequency), and age at first incarceration (Gendreau, Little, & Goggin, 1996).

* Dynamic. These are the factors that can change and that are regarded as suitable areas for improvement in correctional treatment. These criminological needs include antisocial cognitions, values, and behaviors (Gendreau et al., 1996).

When deciding on acceptable risk, both static and dynamic factors should be considered. Static factors determine whether an offender is a good candidate for treatment. Dynamic factors direct the treatment itself by changing offenders' criminological needs and reducing the likelihood of their future criminal behavior. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Correctional Treatment: Developing a Successful Program
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.