Coming Changes in Estate, Gift Taxes Stir 'Frenzy'

By Carpenter, Dave | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, October 24, 2012 | Go to article overview

Coming Changes in Estate, Gift Taxes Stir 'Frenzy'


Carpenter, Dave, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


CHICAGO >> Taxes that are largely a concern of the very rich will soon affect far more people unless Congress steps in.

The impending drastic changes in the estate and gift tax laws are prompting a flurry of activity as 2013 draws near. Family members are making financial gifts, creating trusts and considering other tax-minded moves.

Financial advisers, and trust and estate attorneys have been flooded with requests for assistance in the final months before the record-high exemption for both taxes is scheduled to plunge to $1 million from $5.12 million on Jan 1.

If unaltered, the value of any estate in excess of $1 million will be subject to the estate tax, at a top rate of 55 percent next year, before passing to family or other heirs. Currently the top rate is 35 percent, starting at a level more than five times higher.

"There's been a little bit of a frenzy all of a sudden," says Janis Cowhey McDonagh, a principal with New York accounting firm Marcum LLP. "People are saying 'Wait a minute, this is really going away. I need to do something before the end of the year.'"

The concern may not stir sympathy among most middle-class Americans, but it's a pressing issue for many in costly locations where it's not unusual for household assets to surpass the million-dollar mark.

The new rates would affect roughly 55,000 estates next year, according to Congress' Joint Committee on Taxation, compared with fewer than 4,000 under current rates.

"If you live in a major city and you have a home and a vacation home, you can easily have more than $1 million in assets without being what's thought of as 'filthy rich,'" says Martin Shenkman, an estate planning attorney in Paramus, N.J.

An example cited by Fidelity Investments underscores the impact of the potential change. A single person or married couple with an estate of $3 million could face a $945,000 federal estate tax bill next year. Under current law, that bill is zero.

Heightening the 11th-hour tax commotion are the near-identical drops in the lifetime gift tax exemption and the generation-skipping transfer tax. The latter is imposed on grandchildren or others who are 37½ years younger than you.

Wealthy families who are set up to pass along millions to their children and grandchildren are scrambling to give away or otherwise set aside huge chunks of their assets in the next two months. The aim is to lessen their future estate tax liability and spare their heirs much larger bills.

Both the gift and estate tax rates could be revised further after the November elections. President Barack Obama prefers an estate-tax exemption of $3.5 million and a top rate of 45 percent. Republican challenger Mitt Romney wants to eliminate the estate tax but retain the gift tax as is.

But congressional action would still be needed to enact any changes, which is why taxpayers with million-dollar estates are scurrying to make changes now.

Here are some of the key strategic moves that can be made, with the assistance of attorneys and advisers, to gain a tax advantage before the laws change:

GIVE AWAY CASH.

For the time being, taxpayers can gift as much as $5.12 million during their lifetimes without paying taxes. That total is above and beyond the $13,000 annual gift-tax exemption that many taxpayers are aware of. That exclusion allows you to make an unlimited number of gifts of up to $13,000 each year without incurring any taxes. …

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