Higher Education and the 108th Congress

By Smith, Mark F. | Academe, January/February 2003 | Go to article overview

Higher Education and the 108th Congress


Smith, Mark F., Academe


GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

The last session of Congress distinguished itself more by partisan division than by any sense of genuine accomplishment.

The failure to reach agreement on eleven of the thirteen appropriations bills before adjourning for the election symbolized congressional ineffectiveness. Even as sober a columnist as the Washington Post's David Broder characterized the outgoing Congress as the "little engine that couldn't." The good news is that a new Congress has been elected and will begin addressing the nation's problems in January. The bad news is that the same issues will probably bedevil the new Congress even with unified partisan control.

The Republicans held their majority in the House and took control of the Senate, but the narrowness of their majorities will make bipartisan cooperation essential. If Congress expects to produce legislative accomplishments, the parties will have to work together, which will become even more difficult as the 2004 presidential election approaches. The last few presidents have run for election by distinguishing themselves from Congress, making cooperation difficult. Even with a shared partisan outlook, Congress and the White House have conflicting institutional goals that will cause divisions.

Before the new agenda can be tackled, Congress must address several pieces of unfinished business from the last session. Partisan gridlock delayed creation of the Homeland Security Department, prevented agreement on prescription drug coverage, and, most embarrassing, blocked action on the most basic responsibility of Congressfunding the programs of the federal government. The lame duck session simply deferred appropriations decisions, and the new Congress will have to deal with the specific pieces of legislation left over from last session and develop processes that will prevent such embarrassment in the future.

In the area of higher education, Congress has two critical tasks: to reauthorize the Higher Education Act and to provide adequate funding for student aid, research, and institutional support programs. Federal funding is more important than ever given the economic downturn in the states. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Higher Education and the 108th Congress
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.