National Center on Secondary Education and Transition

Techniques, February 2003 | Go to article overview

National Center on Secondary Education and Transition


Teacher's Toolbox is designed to provide teachers with useful information, including helpful hints and links to beneficial Web sites.

The National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET) was established two years ago to provide resources for educators, policymakers, community service professionals, families and young people with disabilities. It is intended to help improve the experiences of youth with disabilities in secondary education, transition, postsecondary education and employment.

In October, NCSET announced the launch of its new Web site, which now includes topical information, an online newsletter, briefs, policy updates and a calendar of national events.

"This new Web site brings together a wealth of information that has historically been difficult to access," says NCSET Director David R. Johnson. "Now teachers, parents, community agency professionals, youth with disabilities and others all have somewhere to turn for answers."

NCSET is a partnership of six organizations: The Institute on Community Integration, the National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Educational Supports, TransCen, Inc., the Institute for Educational Leadership, the PACER Center and the National Association of State Directors of Special Education. It is headquartered at the Institute on Community Integration at the University of Minnesota and is funded by a five-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs.

For more information, visit www.ncset.org.

Help for Educators on Equity Issues

The U.S. Department of Education funds 10 equity assistance centers to provide assistance for school districts in areas of race, gender and national origin equity in order to promote equal education opportunities.

These centers help teachers, administrators and other school staff deal with concerns such as minority students being underrepresented in AP courses, gender fairness, hate crimes and language learning.

Here is a list of the 10 equity assistance centers and their Web site addresses.

Region I

The New England Equity Assistance Center serves Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. http://www.alliance.brown.edu/eac

Region II

The Equity Assistance Center serves New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

http://www.nyu.edu/education/ metrocenter/EAC.html

Region III

The Mid-Atlantic Equity Consortium serves the District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia. www maec.org

Region IV

The Southeastern Equity Center serves Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. www.southeastequity.org

Region V

Programs for Educational Opportunity serves Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. http://www.umich.edu/~eqtynet/eac.html

Region VI

The South Central Collaborative for Equity serves Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. www.idra.org/scce

Region VII

The Midwest Equity Assistance Center serves Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.

http://mdac.educ.ksu.edu

Region VIII

The Interwest Equity Assistance Center serves Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska.

http://www.colostate.edu/programs/EAC /index.html

Region IX

The WestEd Center for Educational Equity serves Arizona, California and Nevada.

http://web.wested.org/cs/wew/view/pj/188

Region X

The Equity Center serves Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, American Samoa Micronesia, Guam, Marshall Islands, Northern Mariana Islands and the Republic of Palau.

http://www.nwrel.org/cnorse

Gardening Resources for

Educators The University of Vermont's Division of Continuing Education will offer three credits for the National Gardening Association's online course for educators, From Seed to Seed: Plant Science for K-8 Educators. …

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