Intel File

By Bonner, Kit | Sea Classics, January 2013 | Go to article overview

Intel File


Bonner, Kit, Sea Classics


Latest Naval & Maritime Happenings Around the World

USS PORTER SEVERLY DAMAGED IN COLLISION

Even for the expert seaman aided by modern electronics, the shipping lanes off the Musandum Peninsula in the Strait of Hormuz can be treacherous. Shortly after 0100 local time on 12 August 2012, the USS Porter (DDG-78), an Arleigh Burke-class guidedmissile destroyer, collided with the Japanese owned 300,000 ton supertanker M/V Otowasan. Both vessels were just outside the abbreviated shipping lanes of the Ormuz Strait. The designated shipping lanes are 2-mi in width. With due diligence, shipping uses this strait thousands of times a year without incident.

The Porter was deployed to the 5th fleet based in Bahrain, and the Otowasan was intent on leaving the Persian Gulf and en route to the Strait of Hormuz. The tanker was moving at 12.7-kts (course 61-deg). For some reason (yet to be released) the USS Porter at 14.1-kts, passed off the bow of the tanker and was rammed on the starboard side just forward of the superstructure. It appears that the Porter turned back on its track, and when emerging from this maneuver was directly in line with tanker.

Although both vessels were deemed seaworthy and no casualties reported, it is obvious that the Porter was severely damaged. The Porter was diverted to the port of Jebel Ali, UAE, and the Otowasan continued with its cargo of 1.9 million barrels of oil.

The captain of the Porter has been relieved of command.

"BIG E" TO BE INACTIVATED AFTER 51 -YEARS OF SERVICE

The US Navy's unofficial flagship and America's favorite aircraft carrier, the USS Enterprise (CVN65), will soon enter the Valhalla of aircraft carriers. After 51-years of diverse and vital service to the US Navy and the nation, the old warrior will be inactivated on 1 December 2012 at the Norfolk Naval Base.

The Enterprise was commissioned on 25 November 1961 and went on to serve in 25 major deployments in all of the world's maritime hot spots. Its early career included the Cuban Missile Crisis and concluded with the Persian Gulf. Currently, it is estimated that there are over 100,000 veterans of the "Big E," and many can be expected to attend the inactivation ceremony.

USS FORT WORTH. THE NAVY'S NEWEST LÍTT0RAL COMBAT SHIP COMMISSIONED

On 22 September 2012, the third Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), USS Fort Worth (LCS-3), was commissioned in Port Galveston, Texas. The Fort Worth is a Freedomclass LCS, and was built at Lockheed Martin located in Marinette, Wisconsin. The contract cost was $470,854,144.

The .Freedom-class is characterized by a monohull design, and can reach a sustained speed of 45-kts developed from two Rolls-Royce MT-30 36mKw gas turbines/FM Colt Pielstick STC diesel engines. This plant drives four Rolls-Royce water jets. The Fort Worth displaces 2862-tons #1 and is 378.9-ft in length with a 57-ft beam and a draft of 14-ft. The small draft is critical for its inner coast work and high speeds.

Its armament consists of a single Mark 110 57mm Naval gun system (single mount forward). …

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