Palliative Care Nursing: Quality Care to the End of Life

By Belcher, Anne E. | Nursing Education Perspectives, May/June 2002 | Go to article overview

Palliative Care Nursing: Quality Care to the End of Life


Belcher, Anne E., Nursing Education Perspectives


Palliative Care Nursing: Quality Care to the End of Life

edited by Marianne LaPorte Matzo, PhD, RN, GNP, CS, and Deborah Witt Sherman, PhD, RN, ANP, CS; New York: Springer Publishing, 2001; 545 pages, $59.95

As my goddaughter, who is not a nurse, said to me recently, "Palliative care is so important for people with cancer as well as many other serious illnesses. Bill Moyer made it clear in his PBS special. `Dying in America.' that we need to give greater attention to the needs of the seriously ill." Naturally, I, her oncology nurse/educator godmother, beamed with pride that she had such insight into this important aspect of health care.

When I opened this text, I was immediately captivated by how the editors used as its organizing framework the essential nursing competencies proposed by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in the 1998 document "Peaceful Death." I agree with Betty Rolling Ferrell, who states in her foreword that "this text.. will be recognized as a foundation for nursing education."

Nurses who provide palliative care must have both compassion and competence. The authors represented in this book demonstrate their knowledge and appreciation of this philosophical perspective. Each topic is addressed with sensitivity, a holistic perspective, and a wealth of evidence-based practice. As an educator, I particularly valued the education plan provided at the end of each chapter. These plans include the knowledge, attitudes, and skills required for attaining competence as well as undergraduate and graduate behavioral outcomes and teaching-learning strategies. What more could a faculty member, staff development educator, or deliverer of continuing education ask for?

Themes reflected throughout the text include the emphasis on patient and family education and support, the value of the interdisciplinary team, the importance of communication, and the need to provide palliative care within the context of quality of life. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Palliative Care Nursing: Quality Care to the End of Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.