What Are You Reading?

The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE, November 8, 2012 | Go to article overview

What Are You Reading?


A weekly look over the shoulders of our scholar-reviewers.

Susan Hogan, professor of cultural studies, University of Derby, is reading Julia Long's Anti-Porn: The Resurgence of Anti-Pornography Feminism (Zed Books, 2012). "The book charts the way that 'freedom of speech' and anti-state control sentiments have undermined legitimate concerns about the rise in pornography. Long charts legal attempts to demonstrate links between porn and sexual violence, as well as efforts to differentiate between different types of pornography; the result makes for fascinating reading."

E. Stina Lyon, professor emeritus of sociology, London South Bank University, is reading Contemporary Grandparenting: Changing Family Relationships in Global Contexts (Policy Press, 2012). "These essays revealingly explore the contradictions and ambiguities inherent in grandparenting. There are millions of us across the globe, yet we are largely invisible. As (the) elderly we are a financial 'burden', yet we regularly act as child, mother and kinship 'savers'. We are expected to be there, but asked not to interfere. And we do it for love. Remarkable."

Karen McAulay, music and academic services librarian, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, is reading Franny Moyle's Desperate Romantics: The Private Lives of the Pre-Raphaelites (John Murray, 2009). "Having just visited the Pre-Raphaelites exhibition at Tate Britain, I had my interest in the painters themselves whetted by the excellent commentaries beside each painting. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What Are You Reading?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.