Abercrombie Presses Need for Preschool

By DePledge, Derrick | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, January 6, 2013 | Go to article overview

Abercrombie Presses Need for Preschool


DePledge, Derrick, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


The video shows a ponytailed girl wearing an orange jail-like uniform, struggling to play hopscotch and climb a jungle gym because her hands and feet are shackled.

"Don't imprison our children's future," the video warns, part of an advertising campaign by Good Beginnings Alliance for universal preschool for Hawaii's 4-year-olds.

Hawaii is one of 11 states without a state-funded early learning program to help children prepare for kindergarten. Gov. Neil Abercrombie has made the creation of a school readiness program the top priority in his two-year budget draft, asking for $2.9 million for planning in fiscal year 2014 and $28.2 million to serve about 3,500 at-risk 4-year-olds in fiscal year 2015.

If the program were successful, it would be expanded over the next decade, eventually serving most of the state's 18,000 4-year-olds at a cost of more than $150 million a year.

But similar ideas over the past decade have failed to take shape because of questions about cost and whether the state can properly execute the program.

Research indicates that early childhood education can help children develop and reduce costs in education, social services and criminal justice over the long term, but only if children are exposed to high-quality preschool environ­ments. Without consistent standards, talented teachers and involved parents, taxpayer money could be wasted on what amounts to glorified day care.

The Abercrombie administration wants state lawmakers to approve the initial money before knowing exactly what standards would guide the program, how the money would be split between public and private preschools, and how preschools would be held accountable for meeting the state's goals.

The administration also wants lawmakers to agree to a constitutional amendment so private preschools could receive state money. Article X of the Constitution prohibits the state from using public funds to support private education institutions.

"I think what's been hard is that we have not had that vision in the state to wait long-term, right?" said Terry Lock, the director of the governor's Executive Office on Early Learning. "And to take a risk and to start programs like this."

Lock said the state would use the year of planning to set standards, establish a data collection system for monitoring, and enter into contracts with preschools that agree to maintain high-quality programs.

The Executive Office on Early Learning has already released research-based standards that identify the knowledge and behavior expected of children from birth to kindergarten.

Forty-two percent of children in Hawaii enter kindergarten without preschool.

At the start, the school readiness program would serve 4-year-olds who will no longer have the option of junior kindergarten at public schools because the state is eliminating junior kindergarten after the 2013-2014 school year.

Lawmakers determined that junior kindergarten, which began in 2006, was never sufficiently funded, poorly implemented and largely ineffective, in part because younger students were often blended into kindergarten classes.

The state estimates that about 5,100 children will miss the cutoff for the 2014-15 school year, turning 5 after Aug. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Abercrombie Presses Need for Preschool
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.