Durability Principles versus Sustainable Development, Eco-Development with Reference to Forms of Natural Valuable Areas

By Zielinska, Anetta | Economics & Sociology, July 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

Durability Principles versus Sustainable Development, Eco-Development with Reference to Forms of Natural Valuable Areas


Zielinska, Anetta, Economics & Sociology


ABSTRACT. The aim of this article is to identify durability principles in relation to sustainable development, eco-development and forms of natural valuable areas. Sustainable development accepts sensitive and strong durability principle, however, it does not accept a weak durability principle and restrictive principle. Eco-development does not accept a weak and sensitive durability principle, does not partly accept strong principle, but it accepts restrictive principle. Only one durability principle does not refer to any form of natural valuable areas, it is a weak principle.

JEL Classification : Q26, Q01, Q29

Keywords: natural valuable areas, sustainable development, ecodevelopment

Introduction

One should distinguish a term eco-development from a term sustainable development. Eco-development term is narrower than a term - sustainable development, because in a term eco-development we usually focus on environmental and natural context of social development, in the second plan we take into account such issues like: economic development and widely understood social development, and - in case of conflict among these spheres - one accepts the primacy of ecological demands in comparison with economic or social demands (Compare: Wskazniki ekorozwoju (Eco-development indicators), 1999, section 3; Zablocki, 2002; Czaja, Fiedor et al, 2002, section. 8).

For Stefana Kozlowski eco-development means, "development based on ecological criteria, in other words the one, which is accomplished in accordance with natural conditions, or creating socio-economic development without destruction of natural resources" (Kozlowski, 2000, p. 83). A term sustainable development itself, can be found in Environmental Protection Act (Journal of Environmental Law, 2008). In Article 3, Section 5 there is the following record: it is understood that such a socio-economic development, where the integration process of political, economic and social action take place, at the same time retaining natural balance and durability of fundamental natural processes, in order to guarantee a possibility to satisfy basic needs of particular societies or citizens for contemporary as well as future generations.

At first this idea was called an organic growth, using the influence of ecology and nature studies.In the second report for Rome Club "Mankind in a turning point", it was written: "... this pattern of sustainable and non-sustainable growth constitutes a crucial source of most urgent problems facing mankind, a leading way to their solution, is a way of organic growth" (Mesarovic, Pestel, 1977, p. 40).

The essence of sustainable development lies in finding a proper balance (proportion) among economy, society, space or nature. An attitude towards sustainable development according to a principle criterion lies in the choice of the durability level. A durability level defines pressure on environment protection and strength in approaching to retaining natural capital, taking into account economy and society's needs in a contemporary generation (Jezowski, 2009, p. 28).

In the early period, when the concept of sustainable development appeared, more often the notion of eco-development was used, which strongly emphasized ecological dimension of processes. First definitions appeared at the turn of 1980s and 1990s.

Durability idea refers well to the forms of natural valuable areas, including (look further Zielinska, 2010, pp. 211-220):

* national parks and nature reserves, landscape parks, the areas of protected landscape and Natura 2000 areas;

* the forms of individual protection including: natural feature of historic importance, documentary positions, ecological arable lands, nature-landscape complexes;

* the forms of the species protection of plants, animals and mushrooms (in situ, ex situ);

* botanical gardens, zoological gardens and rehabilitation centres for animals;

* greenery and tree-covered areas;

* and additionally beyond legal protection. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Durability Principles versus Sustainable Development, Eco-Development with Reference to Forms of Natural Valuable Areas
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.