Exhibition Highlights Muslim Inventions

By Saif, Hamzah | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, November/December 2012 | Go to article overview

Exhibition Highlights Muslim Inventions


Saif, Hamzah, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Following its immensely popular appearances in Los Angeles (see August 2011 Washington Report, p. 30), New York, Istanbul and London, National Geographic's award-wining interactive exhibition "1001 Muslim Inventions" opened its doors to audiences at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, DC late this summer.

The exhibition begins with a 10-minute video starring English actor Sir Ben Kingsley as a librarian admonishing young British children on the provincialism of the phrase, 'Dark Ages.' "It is a matter of perspective," he advises, noting that Muslim civilization was in its Golden Age at the time.

Stepping through the doors, the eye first catches a 20-foot replica of Muslim polymath Badi'al-Zaman al-Jazari's clock, emblematic of the breadth of cultures on which the exhibit draws. The elephant represents India, the carpet draped over its back Persia, the figures Arabia, the phoenix Egypt, and the dragons China-all synthesized by a Kurdish engineer innovating Greek technology.

The amalgam is a result of Arab expansion in the centuries following the Prophet Muhammad's death. The rapid spread of Islam in its first centuries provided fertile fodder for invention and innovation. Astronomy, mathematics, physics, literature and medical sciences flourished as Arabs combined their rich history with those of their new lands. From this trove of accumulated knowledge arose a great collection of literary, philosophical and scientific works that fundamentally altered the course of history.

The exhibit's seven stations-home, school, market, hospital, town, world and universe-highlight the depth of these contributions to our contemporary experience.

The "Home" station introduces scientist Ibn al-Haytham, whose innovative use of the pinhole principle enabled modern camera technology. More plebeian inventions-soap, shampoo and toothbrushes-also find their antecedent in Muslim innovation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Exhibition Highlights Muslim Inventions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.