Citizens More Than Soldiers: The Kentucky Militia and Society in the Early Republic/Middle Tennessee, 1775-1825: Progress and Popular Democracy on the Southwestern Frontier/The Ramsey at Swan Pond: The Archaeology and History of an East Tennessee Farm

By Stewart, Bruce E. | Journal of the Early Republic, October 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

Citizens More Than Soldiers: The Kentucky Militia and Society in the Early Republic/Middle Tennessee, 1775-1825: Progress and Popular Democracy on the Southwestern Frontier/The Ramsey at Swan Pond: The Archaeology and History of an East Tennessee Farm


Stewart, Bruce E., Journal of the Early Republic


Citizens More Than Soldiers: The Kentucky Militia and Society in the Early Republic. By Harry S. Laver. (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2007. Pp. 216. Cloth, $45.00.)

Middle Tennessee, 1775-1825: Progress and Popular Democracy on the Southwestern Frontier. By Kristofer Ray. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2007. Pp. 236. Illustrations. Maps. Cloth, $41.00.)

The Ramsey s at Swan Pond: The Archaeology and History of an East Tennessee Farm. By Charles H. Faulkner. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2008. Pp. 168. Illustrations. Cloth, $39.95.)

Reviewed by Bruce E. Stewart

When touring the United States in the 1830s, French historian and philosopher Alexis de Tocqueville witnessed a society in flux. Since the end of the American Revolution in 1783, the country had confronted several changes and challenges, many of which remained unresolved. Population growth, advancements in transportation, and the expansion of the market economy had, among other phenomena, transformed traditional notions of masculinity, deepened class tensions, and given rise to the creation of a national two-party system. As de Tocqueville discovered, however, even as the country was becoming more divided along political, class, racial, and gender lines, many Americans (especially white males) be- lieved that democracy had expanded over the past half century. The three books under review broaden historical understandings of this tur- bulent period. Harry S. Laver 's Citizens More Than Soldiers and Kris- tofer Ray's Middle Tennessee, 1775-1825 explain the reasons for class conflict and the rise of democracy on the American frontier, while Charles H. Faulkner's The Ramsey s at Swan Pond examines the daily life and social history of settlers living in Appalachian Tennessee during the early nineteenth century.

In Citizens More Than Soldiers, Laver sheds new light on the impor- tant role that the militia played in shaping American society during the early nineteenth century. Focusing on Kentucky, Laver argues that the militia there was not a "peripheral and fleeting" organization composed of "drunken buffoons who stumbled into a crooked line, poked each other with cornstalk weapons, and inevitably shot their commander in the backside with a rusty, antiquated musket" (1). Instead, he insists that the militia helped Kentuckians (especially white males) adapt to changing socioeconomic conditions and aided in the democratization of the elec- torate. "More than a dysfunctional military reserve," Laver writes, "the militia established community identities and social structure, participated in politics, kept the public peace, encouraged economic activity, and defined what it meant to be a man" (8).

Laver first chronicles the impact that the militia had on the commu- nity. Using mostly newspapers, he posits that militia musters were popu- lar events that allowed Kentucky denizens the opportunity to strengthen communal bonds. Perhaps more importantly, these militia rallies, espe- cially those held on the Fourth of July and commemorations of George Washington's Birthday, helped to cultivate a national identity among participants and onlookers. These militia celebrations, however, also re- inforced class, racial, and gender hierarchies. White men, for instance, were the only members of the community who could directly participate in them, thereby pushing women and African Americans further away from the public sphere. Meanwhile, militia officers, most of whom came from prominent families, often led the processions and reminded lower class militiamen of their place in the social hierarchy. The rank and file, Col. William Russell explained to his men in 1808, were to be "orderly and obedient" (40).

Laver then delves into the militia's role in the creation of a two-party system in Kentucky politics during the 1830s. He ultimately posits that the militia served as a "proto-political organization." Militia officers, many of whom would parlay their militia record into a political career, often used their position to promote partisan activities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Citizens More Than Soldiers: The Kentucky Militia and Society in the Early Republic/Middle Tennessee, 1775-1825: Progress and Popular Democracy on the Southwestern Frontier/The Ramsey at Swan Pond: The Archaeology and History of an East Tennessee Farm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.