Where Happiness Lives

By Brenzel, Kathleen N.; Cooper, Jeanne et al. | Sunset, January 2013 | Go to article overview

Where Happiness Lives


Brenzel, Kathleen N., Cooper, Jeanne, Fish, Peter, Geidt, Mackenzie, Jaffe, Matthew, Sunset


HAWAIIANS are the most content people in the country. WHAT CAN THE REST OF US LEARN FROM THEM? Ten remarkable locals show you how to live We good Me, island-style.

A glorious view of Kauai's Kalalau Valley from the Koke'e State Park lookout at 4,000 feet

MY HAPPY PLACE

MT. OLOMANA OAHU

"The mountain looms large in our lives: It composes the bulk of our view from the backyard. The hike up it is about a mile and a half; with an elevation gain of 1,643 feet. When you get to the top, you feel like you're standing on a mere stiver of land. You can see the spectrum of Oahu - you're overwhelmed by nature yet managing it in some way."

-KAUI HARTHEMMINGS, AUTHOR OF THE DESCENDANTS

HOW THE LOCALS N LIVE

Novelist KAUi hart hemmings didn't realize how much she needed Hawaii until she moved away.

IN MY LAST BOOK, The Descendants, the patriarch, a Honolulu attorney, takes a good look at his paradisiacal life and declares: "Paradise can go #!#% itself." He obviously didn't contribute to the Gallup Poll that each year determines that we Hawaii dwellers have the highest level of well-being of any state in the U.S. Indeed, "Lucky we live Hawaii" is a common sentiment (and hashtag). But are we as happy as the pollsters say? And if so, why?

I can't answer for everyone. But I will look at my family's life over a few days and try to glean some answers. What is different about Hawaii?

Sunday morning at our house on Oahu's Windward Coast. We ask our two kids what they want to do.

"Beach, I guess," our 7-year-old daughter says.

"Wave," our 2-year-old says after he hears the word "beach."

We head to Kailua Beach, about a five-minute drive away. We go to Kalamas, past the kitesurfers, and let our dog, Bob, off his leash. Sometimes we bring Bob's bodyboard too- he catches waves to the delight of tourists- but today we're just here for a little while. We run into my brother and sister-in-law and their three kids. Daphne just got off her shift - she's a surgeon at Honolulu's Queens hospital. The kids surf; I head off for a quick walk, intending to exercise, but end up bumping into friends. I socialize more than sweat, which is fine - it's almost impossible to be on this beach without meeting someone you know.

There's a nice breeze and because of the expanse of the beach it's not too crowded. Kids are digging holes like it's their profession; their parents are drinking coffee and reading books.

When I return, the kids are still surfing, my son is busy in the sand, and my close friend happens to have come down with her kids and a cooler of lunch and beer.

"Stay?" she asks.

We get home around 1, put our son down for a nap. In the afternoon, some friends stop by to swim in the pool and end up staying for dinner. We rummage through the fridge, find enough things to throw on the grill. Our friend runs home to get some just-caught mahimahi she bought off a fisherman coworker. We bring out the little firepit and roast marshmallows.

Monday morning. I take on the carpool, grocery shop, work, clean the house. After school my daughter wants to hike Mt. Olomana. I oblige - I could use a walk. The mountain looms large in our lives: It composes the bulk of our view from the backyard. The hike up it is about a mile and a half, with an elevation gain of 1,643 feet. When you get to the top, you feel like you're standing on a mere sliver of land. You can see the spectrum of Oahu - you're overwhelmed by nature yet managing it in some way. The last stretch of this hike is difficult and dangerous. Often there's a whir of helicopters rescuing the injured or the afraid. You need ropes to pull yourself up the last section. My daughter and I turn around at the first set of ropes.

Tuesday. Even in Hawaii, not every day is bliss. My husband, originally from Wisconsin, is a Honolulu litigator with a grueling work schedule. His hour commute takes him over the Pali Highway, affording him views of the Windward Coast, and the sharp, sheer cliffs of the Ko'olau mountains. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Where Happiness Lives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.