Anchorage and Beyond


Anchorage makes an excellent base of operations, thanks to lots of local lodgings, nearby destinations, and air links to the state's remotest corners.

No matter where you go, though, remember that summer travel in Alaska demands a fair amount of planning. If you want to explore the state by car, for example, don't leave rentals to chance-availability is a real problem during the high season.

Anchorage lodgings. Downtown is filled with places to stay; for a free visitor guide, call (907) 274-3531. A good alternative to the big hotels is the Moosewood Manor Bed & Breakfast in the hills just below Flattop Mountain. The modern house has beautiful views, and its eco-Zen orientation will be a relief for those who are put off by the sometimes fulsome floral and lace of many B & Bs. $118. (907) 345-8788.

Anchorage hikes. The climb up Flattop Mountain is the most popular ascent in all of Alaska. Although it's only a few miles round trip from the trailhead at Glen Alps, the final rocky stretch to the top can really get your heart going. The reward is excellent views from the switchbacks just short of the summit. The South Fork Trail, 30 minutes by car north of downtown, is an even better bet. In just 9 miles, round trip, the trail takes you through a remarkable cross section of all Alaska has to offer: snowcapped peaks; mountain lakes; a tumbling, rushing river; tundra; and, on my visit last summer, lots of rain. For more information on these and other local trails, call Chugach State Park; (907) 345-50 14.

Visiting the Pribilofs. …

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