Savon the Century

By Anusasananan, Linda Lau | Sunset, May 1998 | Go to article overview

Savon the Century


Anusasananan, Linda Lau, Sunset


After cooking with you for 100 years, we've collected the greatest Western flavors for a most memorable meal

For the last 10 decades at Sunset, we've eaten oysters up and down the West Coast, and beyond. We explored Pacific salmon, Hawaiian papayas, persimmons, avocados, and artichokes-all the treasures that make our region sublimely delicious. Febuary 1929 marked the birth of Kitchen Cabinet, to showcase our readers' favorite dishes, and since then, with your help, we've built an enormous legacy of recipies. Each decade brought new discoveriesand new ingredients. In the '30s and '40s, for example, fresh chilies, cilantro, and ginger, along with soy sauce and pesto, first appeared in our magazine. Now they're mainstream. Entertaining in Sunset has focused on informality and simplicity-nothing-to-it parties, alfresco dining. Above all, we grilled year-round while our Eastern cousins hibernated in the winter. In short, Sunset has recorded-indeed, shaped-the West's unique regional cuisine and casual lifestyle. And this dinner for 8 to 10, or a walk-around party for 24 to 36, is built on our rich heritage.

Sunset's Meal of the Century

Jicama with chili Salt (November 1968)

Indian Relish (September 1934) with Cream Cheese and Crackers

Pop-open Barbecue Clams (May 1969)

NAVARRO VINEYARDS GEWURZTRAMINER 1996

Avocado Soup Mexicana (December 1940)

Crab and Artichoke Salad (January 1945)

CHALK HILL ESTATE VINEYARDS AND WINERY SAUVIGNON BLANC 1995

Pepered Salmon (July 1992)

CHATEAU MONTELENA CHARDONNAY 1995

or

Grilled Merlot Lamb (June 1995)

BERINGER VINEYARDS MERLOT "HOWELL MOUNTAIN" 1994

and

Mixed Grain Pilaf (April 1980)

Asparagus with 10-Second Hollandaise (March 1955)

Sheepherder's Bread (june 1976)

Kona Macadamia-Caramel Torte (Febuary 1984)

QUADY WINERY ESSENSIA 1995

Strawberries with Sour Cream Dip (May 1958)

BONNY DOON VINEYARD FRAMBOISE NONVINTAGE

Jicama with Chili Salt

PREP TIME: About 20 minutes

NOTES: We discovered this simple appetizer in Mexico; jicama, now grown in the West, has since added crunch to many of our recipes.

MAKES: 8 to 10 servings

1 tablespoon salt

1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon chili powder

1 jicama (1 1/2 to 2 lbs.)

1 or 2 limes

1. Mix salt with chili powder to taste. Place in a small, shallow bowl.

2. Peel jicama. Rinse and cut into 1/4inch-thick wedges or 1/z-inch-thick sticks 3 to 4 inches long.

3. Cut limes into wedges. Arrange jicama, limes, and chili salt on a platter.

4. To eat, rub jicama with lime, then dip in chili salt.

Per serving: 26 cal., 3.5% (0.9 cal.) from fat; 0.5 g protein; 0.1 g fat (0 g sat.); 6.3 g carbo (3.1 g fiber); 662 mg sodium; 0 mg chol.

Indian Relish

PREP AND COOK TIME: About 35 minutes

NOTES: Recipes for pickling and canning peppered our early pages. In a modern menu, this colorful relish works perfectly spooned over a mound of cream cheese or a wedge of ripe brie. Scoop onto crackers to eat. Store the relish, covered, in the refrigerator up to 1 month; serve at room temperature.

MAKES: About 1 1/2 cups; 8 to 10 servings

2 red bell peppers (1 lb. total)

1 onion (1/2 lb.), finely chopped

1 cup white wine vinegar

1 cup sugar

1 to 2 tablespoons hot chili flakes (optional)

Salt

1. Discard bell pepper stems and seeds; finely chop bell peppers.

2. In a 2- to 2 1/2-quart pan, combine bell peppers, onion, vinegar, sugar, and chili to taste. Bring to boiling over high heat.

3. Stir often over medium-high heat until liquid looks syrupy and is reduced to about 3 tablespoons, about 25 minutes. Add salt to taste.

4. Cool and serve.

Per tablespoon: 41 ca. 0% (0 cal. …

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