Wines with History

By MacNeil, Karen | Sunset, May 1998 | Go to article overview

Wines with History


MacNeil, Karen, Sunset


With the jicama, Indian relish, and barbecue clam appetizers

Navarro Vineyards Gewurztraminer 1996 (Anderson Valley), $14

The tangy flavors of the relish (lots of sugar and vinegar) need a dramatic companion. Navarro is widely considered the best Gewurztraminer in America-about three levels above the rest of the pack. The winery, one of the first in the Anderson Valley (Mendocino County, California), was founded in 1974 and specializes in Gewurztraminer; Gewurz was the first variety it planted. The wine is extremely popular; order by calling (707) 895-3686.

With the avocado soup and crab and artichoke salad

Chalk Hill Estate Vineyards and Winery Sauvignon Blanc 1995 (Chalk Hill, Sonoma), $16

Chalk Hill makes one of the lushest, most hedonistic Sauvignon Blancs in the West-characteristics necessary to go with these two recipes, with all their bold flavors. The winery, founded in 1980, is the only one in California that is its own appellation. In other words, in the Chalk Hill wine-growing region, there's just one winery: Chalk Hill.

With the peppered salmon Chateau Montelena Chardonnay 1995 (Napa Valley), $25

Chateau Montelena was founded in 1882, but the winery operated only sporadically after Prohibition. In 1972 it was bought and revived by the Barrett family, and a year later made a Chardonnay that shocked the world by winning the legendary Paris Tasting of 1976. …

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