2013 Best in Treatment

Psychology Today, January/February 2013 | Go to article overview

2013 Best in Treatment


Our Exclusive Guide to America's Top Facilities For Addiction Recovery And Therapeutic Care

Best in Treatment

SUBSTANCE ABUSE costs America more than $600 billion a year, according to the National Institutes of Health. But that doesn't begin to encompass the tragic cost of squandered individual potential and the stress it places on families. Yet effective treatments are available that address the complexities of substance abuse. To help individuals, families, and therapists be more aware of the options available, Psychology Today has created this directory of facilities offering The Best in Treatment.

Alpine Academy

Erda, UT

P: (866) 662-1602, Website www.alpineacademy.org

Distinction: Licensed, intensive residential treatment program with the services and feel of an upscale boarding school

Beds: 54

Gender: Female Only

Age: 12-18 (Grades 7-12)

Detox: No

Sliding Scale: Yes

Insurance: No

Hospital Affiliated: Yes

Average Stay: 9-12 Months

Price: $429 per day; $13,000 for 30 days; Privatepay discount available

Treatment Focus: Depression, Anxiety, Developing Personality/Mood Disorders, Attachment Disorders

Program at a glance:

Some highlights of our unique treatment approach include: intensive clinical work that includes individual, group, and family therapy, on-site psychiatric services, individualized social skills training, and transition-focused therapeutic family weekends. We also offer a variety of customizable experiential therapy interventions for our students, such as equine-assisted psychotherapy, art therapy, DBT focused treatment, EMDR, and a variety of specialty group offerings. We are an accredited private school; the teaching staff includes a principal, guidance counselor, SPED director, and dually endorsed, highly qualified teachers. This evidence-based treatment approach helps young women to realize long-term change.

Amen Clinics

Newport Beach, CA; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA; New York, NY; Washington, DC; Atlanta, GA

P: (888) 564-2700, Website www.amenclinics.com

Distinction: Staff/Patient Ratio 2.5/1

Beds: N/A

Gender: Both

Age: All

Detox: No

Sliding Scale: No

Insurance: No

Hospital Affiliated: No

Average Stay: Outpatient

Price: Individual Services $175 and up. Comprehensive Evaluation including Brain SPECT Imaging $3,575

Treatment Focus: ADD, Anxiety, Depression, Mood and Behavioral Disorders, Eating Disorders, Addictions, PTSD, Brain Trauma, Memory Issues, Brain Fog or Other Cognitive Issues

Program at a glance:

Founded in 1989, the Amen Clinics put into practice groundbreaking research and decades of professional experience of double board certified psychiatrist Daniel G. Amen, MD. The Clinics have one of the leading success rates for treating ADD, anxiety, depression, mood and behavioral disorders, eating disorders, addictions, PTSD, brain trauma, memory issues, brain fog, and other cognitive issues. Amen Clinics do a thorough intake clinical evaluation along with labs, and use brain SPECT imaging, which measures blood flow and brain activity. Physicians target treatment to individual patients' brains, rather than applying broad psychiatric categories. Amen Clinics utilize integrative modalities to develop comprehensive and targeted patient treatment plans.

Bayshore Retreat

Destin, FL

P: (850) 260-0859, Website www.bayshoreretreat.com

Distinction: Staff/Patient Ratio 3 to I1 Florida Licensed & Court Approved

Beds: 6

Gender: Both

Age: 18+

Detox: Yes

Sliding Scale: No

Insurance: No

Hospital Affiliated: No

Average Stay: 30-45 Days

Price: $19,500 for 30 Days, $36,000 for 60 Days

Treatment Focus: Drug and Alcohol Addiction

Program at a glance:

Bayshore Retreat is a unique treatment center that specializes in truly individualized drug and alcohol programs, not the "onesize-fits-all" approach. …

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