From the Tube to the Screen, Negotiations Shift toward Film Industry

By Hair, Ray | International Musician, December 2012 | Go to article overview

From the Tube to the Screen, Negotiations Shift toward Film Industry


Hair, Ray, International Musician


I am very pleased to report that, after years of delays, false starts, disruptions, distractions, and recurrent unhappy endings, on Thursday, October 11, 2012, the Federation reached agreement with NBC, CBS, and ABC network representatives for a successor TV/Videotape Agreement. The agreement covers musicians who work in the house bands and who perform as guests on the most popular programs on television, such as Saturday Night Live, Late Show with David Letterman, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Dancing with the Stars, American Idol, The Voice, General Hospital, and many more.

As many of you may know all too well, our predecessor TV/Videotape Agreement was last negotiated more than 10 years ago in June 2002, and expired in February 2006. After expiration, it was extended indefinitely without a change in terms - no raises, no health care increases, and no "new media" provisions.

The effort to renew and improve the agreement has spread over six years and two AFM administrations, consuming an extraordinary amount of time and expense. That effort also presented some of the most difficult negotiating challenges the Federation has ever confronted. From the beginning, we were faced with employers who refused to recognize the Federation's jurisdiction over new media, and who - once they agreed to recognize that jurisdiction - wanted to reach an agreement that was economically unjust and unfair to our members.

Despite this intransigence - and, frankly, despite the AFM's internal differences that pervaded the atmosphere in negotiating sessions prior to my rebooting and resuming the discussions, our negotiating committee came together and focused union power through the promotion of unprecedented rank-and-file involvement.

As was reported in the November 2012 International Musician, we launched unconventional protest activities on both coasts simultaneously during a brief recess in the talks, all aimed at bringing our concerns to television audiences and the public, a move never before made during any Federation negotiation. We demonstrated to the networks that their protracted delay of contract improvements was at a dead end, and we finally reached an agreement that made considerable, long-awaited progress.

New features of AFM's TV/Videotape Agreement include the following:

* Term of three years from the date of ratification - expected to be on or about January 1, 2013.

* All basic wage rates are increased by 6% during the first year (includes a 4% "market adjustment"), 2% in the second year, and another 2% in the third year.

* Health and welfare contributions rise from $16 to $22 daily in the first year, $24 in the second year, and $25 in the third year, with no weekly cap on contributions.

* Pension contributions rise immediately from 10% to 11%.

In addition, the new agreement contains provisions that recognize the Federation's jurisdiction in new media, and require supplemental payments when programs originally broadcast on free television are later webcast and streamed online, or when programs are made for new media in the first place. Achieving comprehensive and constructive new media provisions with the television industry had eluded the Federation for more than six years, but I am pleased to report that they are now a reality.

In the summer of 2010, Federation convention delegates elected a new administration - one committed to resolving open contracts as expeditiously and as progressively as possible, through open bargaining with increased member participation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From the Tube to the Screen, Negotiations Shift toward Film Industry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.