Don't Blame Yoko

By Willaert, Alan | International Musician, December 2012 | Go to article overview

Don't Blame Yoko


Willaert, Alan, International Musician


More frequently, the Canadian Office has had to process member to member cases that involve intellectual property issues. As technology has allowed for the easy setup of websites and social media accounts, bands have enjoyed marketing techniques that were only a dream 20 years ago.

Along with the ease of creating and distributing audiovisual product, come new challenges when the relationships within a self-contained band go south. For example, a five-piece ensemble, where the leader also owns the truck and production, decide to fire the guitar player. The appropriate two-week notice is given, and a new guitar player is hired. However, the original guitar player is upset because the band continues to promote and sell recordings from their website, which he not only performed on, but co-wrote. In addition, his image is still used on the website and in other promotional materials and vehicles. The complaint is that he was never compensated for the writing, recording, or subsequent use of the product. Add to the mix that there is no AFM paper covering these recordings. While the AFM Bylaws allow us to process a claim for proper compensation for recording, we have no jurisdiction over the intellectual property aspects.

If you are already confused at this point, you are not alone. Many musicians join bands and never give a thought to what kind of relationship they have just entered into, or what the ramifications might be. A few years back, Toronto lawyer Craig Parks created a document for musicians entitled, "Married to the Band." The primary message was that, if you do nothing, the default legal relationship is a partnership, including being jointly and severally liable in the case of a lawsuit.

The best solution is to be proactive, and enter into a band agreement that everyone who joins the group signs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Don't Blame Yoko
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.