Association News


CONVENTION 2013

Participation: Liturgy Life Mission

Consider this your invitation to gather as a member of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians for our Thirty-Sixth Annual Convention, from July 29 to August 2, 2013, in Washington, DC. We gather to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the promulgation of the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy Sacrosanctum Concilium. We gather to see where we have come on our journey, what NPM's role has been in implementing this key liturgical document, and to explore what still remains to be done. We come together to affirm that what was true in 1963 is still true in 2013: "In the restoration and promotion of the sacred liturgy, this full and active participation by all the people is the aim to be considered before all else; for it is the primary and indispensable source from which the faithful are to derive the true Christian spirit. . . ."

The Second Vatican Council has been called the "Council of the Church" because its key documents explored various aspects of the Church's identity and its life. Liturgy, in the familiar phrase, is the "summit and font" of that life. So our five plenum presentations at this convention will examine not only participation in the liturgy but also the kind of participation that the liturgy calls us to in the Church's life and mission.

The place to begin, obviously, is with the call to participation, which Rita Ferrane will address in our keynote presentation on Monday afternoon. We've done well with exterior participation, but what about interior? After all, the exterior needs to come from something deeper, something within.

What "participation" means is determined, to some extent, by context. So on Tuesday, Father John Baldovin, SJ, will help us look at the context in which Sacrosanctum Concilium was promulgated back in 1963 as well as the context in which we study and implement it today.

One of the great gifts of the Second Vatican Council to the worldwide Church was the affirmation that we live and worship and proclaim the Gospel in various cultures. Sacrosanctum Concilium opened the way to adapt the Roman Rite to different groups and peoples. On Wednesday afternoon, Fadier Anscar Chupungco, OSB, will examine how that's been going and what still lies ahead.

Just as external participation has to come from somewhere, so do changes in the way we worship. How have the past fifty years helped us to appreciate the rich heritage that we have received from earlier generations, and how has mat appreciation helped us better understand what authentic reform means? Father Paul Turner will help us explore those questions on Thursday.

As "font, " the liturgy strengthens and impels us to participate in the Church's mission: the glorification of God and the sanctification of the human race. On our closing day, Bernadette Farrell will invite us to a fuller participation in diat mission.

Institutes at the Convention

There are three multi-day institutes at the 2013 Annual Convention. Two are open to all, and one is limited to DMMD members.

Those institutes open to all begin on Monday morning and continue through the breakout sessions, ending on Friday morning. Participation in these institutes requires full convention registration. Opportunities for liturgical prayer and formation will take place as participants join the convention liturgies, plenum presentations, and events.

Chant Institute. Benedictines Anthony Ruff and Peter Funk are the clinicians for this institute that will cover a wide range of chant topics, including reading chant notation, rhythmic interpretation, Latin pronunciation, the use of chant in the liturgy, and the new chants for English texts in the Roman Missal. Participants will learn vocal skills, conducting and rehearsing techniques, and much more. Pre-registrationis required; there is no on-site registration. The fee is $90.00.

Handbell Institute. Donna Kinsey is the clinician for this very popular institute in which participants will learn ringing techniques, how to care for bells, conducting the ringing choir, repertoire, and the place of handbells in the liturgy. …

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