Muslim Women Leaders Speak

By Viscidi, Lisa | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, March 2003 | Go to article overview

Muslim Women Leaders Speak


Viscidi, Lisa, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Four prominent Muslim women leaders spoke about women's leadership and political participation in Muslim societies Nov. 25 at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. Organized in collaboration with the Women's Learning Partnership (WLP), which seeks to empower women and girls in Muslim society, the forum drew a large audience of both sexes.

Opening the proceedings was moderator Azar Nafisi, director of the SAIS Dialogue Project, an initiative designed "to foster the development of democracy and human rights in the Muslim world." A continuing dialogue between Muslim countries and the West is necessary, she said, because the two regions do not exist in isolation from one another. "Sept. 11 taught us that stability and peace in Washington and New York are connected to stability and peace in the streets of Kabul and Tehran," Nafisi pointed out.

Part of the Islam-West dialogue involves trying to understand one another's cultures and avoiding stereotyping. The range of nationalities represented at the meeting, with speakers hailing from Iran, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, Nafisi observed, "shows how difficult it is to categorize Muslim women and have only one image that comes to mind."

Nafisi then asked the panelists first to provide an overview of the opportunities for women's political participation throughout the world, then to focus specifically on women in Muslim countries. WLP president Mahnaz Afkhami, originally from Iran, noted that women's participation in politics worldwide has been relatively recent, with women still unable to vote in some countries. Of all regions in the world, she said, political participation is lowest (under 4 percent) in the Arab Middle East.

The obstacles to women's participation are substantial. "One of the biggest," said Ayesha Imam, co-founder of the first feminist organization in Nigeria, "is lack of money and resources." A double standard also is sometimes employed, she added, with women in politics being considered "dirty" and "loose." Perhaps the greatest obstacle for Muslim women is religious fundamentalism, which Imam defined as "groups of people who use their definition of the group to decide who is a `good' member." This deters women from publicly criticizing the system, Imam explained, lest they be branded a "bad" Muslim.

The West's image of secluded and helpless Muslim women is taken from the stereotypes of religious fundamentalists. The forum participants, however, did not consider this image an accurate depiction of women in their culture. "I don't know why we're being simplified and condensed as if we're all the same commodity," Afkhami objected.

Muslim women, added Thoraya Obaid, executive director of the United Nations Population Fund, "have been minimized into one identity. On CNN you only see images of Afghan women being flogged, but we are not all like that stereotype. …

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