Women in Black Tel Aviv Vigil

By Svirsky, Gila | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, March 2003 | Go to article overview

Women in Black Tel Aviv Vigil


Svirsky, Gila, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Women (and Men) in Black brought reality into the heart of affluent, artsy Tel Aviv, and did it on their terms--using music, art, cinema and street theater, all set into a mass Women (and Men) in Black vigil on Dec. 27. Nearly 1,500 people from all over Israel, as well as from Europe and North America, most dressed in black, spread out on the five corners of one of the busiest intersections of Tel Aviv. Our twin slogans--"End the Occupation" and "No to Racism"--called out from every direction: white lettering on black smocks, black umbrellas, black banners, and the traditional black "hands" of Women in Black.

The day was meant to convey a serious message, but the sudden bright, hot sun after a week of cold winter rains, our own need for respite from the horror, and the Tel Aviv escapist state-of-mind all seemed to get the better of us, turning a protest demonstration into a protest "happening, "with action every few meters:

Two drummers, doing Middle Eastern rhythms;

Five "Angry Old Ladies" singing subversive political lyrics they had written to nursery rhymes and Zionist foot-stompers;

A group from Portugal performing much-loved peace songs with guitars and hand-clapping;

Black Laundry: Lesbians and Homosexuals Against the Occupation with an art installation that defies simple description;

Crates of olives and olive oil, packed into empty soda bottles, sold by peace activists who had helped in the harvest;

To counter the racist "Transfer=Security" stickers that have sprouted all over the country, there were "Transfer=War Crime" stickers, against the background of the yellow Jewish star that had been used by the Nazis during the Holocaust;

The Fifth Mother Movement (carrying on the tradition of the Four Mothers Movement that got Israelis out of Lebanon) sold shirts saying, "War is not my language. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Women in Black Tel Aviv Vigil
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.