Physical Demands of Soccer: Lessons from Team USA and Ghana Matches in the 2010 FIFA WORLD CUP

By Njororai, W. W. S. | Journal of Physical Education and Sport, December 2012 | Go to article overview

Physical Demands of Soccer: Lessons from Team USA and Ghana Matches in the 2010 FIFA WORLD CUP


Njororai, W. W. S., Journal of Physical Education and Sport


Introduction

In modern sports, the emphasis on winning and the competitive spirit of the participants demands a high level of physical and psychological conditioning as well as refined technical-tactical preparation of the individual player (Hughes et al., 2012; Jones & Drust, 2007; Njororai, 2000; 2007; Singh, 1982; Wade, 1972). The preparation of players for high level competition has therefore to be based on solid empirical evidence and scientific practices. Association football (soccer) is a demanding sport technically, tactically, psychologically and physically. In soccer, the physical aspect is expressed in the fight for possession of the ball, running offthe ball, dribbling, tackling, counter attacking, overlapping, and jumping to head the ball and long tactical kicks. All these demand a high level of fitness in the players (Reilly, 1979, 1994, 1995; 2005; Reilly & Thomas, 1984; Stone and Kroll, 1986). The highest level of competition to which all young players aspire to reach and even win is the soccer world cup held after every four years. It is from such a level of competition that lessons are learnt to be incorporated in training and coaching for youth and elite players. The 2010 world cup soccer tournament was held in South Africa from June 11th to July 11th 2010. One of the attributes of the tournament that can be emulated by players in schools, colleges and even club level is the coping with physical demands of a game and a tournament.

The physical ability of a player, especially the aerobic component, provides the stability needed to execute the tactical and technical skills throughout a match and a tournament. Fitness level determines a player's capacity for concentration and crisp play in the late stages of a game. Besides all the physical benefits, being in great overall shape gives a player an important confidence boost and mental edge (Kagan, 2010). The physiological demands of competitive soccer at the elite level require that each player be in good physical condition if s/he is to give maximum effort throughout a particular match or tournament. Thus the optimization of physical fitness is now an integral facet of player and team preparation. One of the consequences of sustaining movement and physical activity for 90 minutes of soccer match-play is that capability of muscle to generate force declines. This impairment is reflected in the decline of work-rate towards the later part of the match (Reilly, 1994; Reilly, Drust, and Clarke, 2006). Association football is a sport where performance should be sustained for a prolonged period. In such prolonged performances, fatigue tends to set in as reflected by inability to sustain the required work-rate (Reilly et al., 2006).

Due to the importance of the physical aspects of soccer, a lot of studies have been done especially on male players. For a long time the best approach was using labor intensive time-motion analysis which demonstrated that elite male players typically cover a total distance of 9 - 14 km during a game (Ekblom, 1986; Hoff, 2005; Mohr, Krustrup & Bangsbo, 2005; Muckle, 1981; Reilly, 1979, 1995; Wade, 1972; Winterbottom, 1964), while the females covered between 8 to 12 km (Carling, Bloomfield, Nelsen and Reilly, 2008). The advent of computerized motion analysis has made it easier to monitor the physical demands during a game including the distances covered by players.

According to Impellizzeri, Rampinini & Marcora (2005), aerobic training is an important component of physical training in soccer. The relevance of aerobic training to soccer has been confirmed by studies showing a relationship between aerobic power and competitive ranking, quality of play and distance covered during the match (Bangsbo & Lindquist, 1992; Hoff, 2005). Mohr et al. (2005) cites Helgerud, Engen, Wisloffand Hoffwho established that aerobic training can improve some aspects of soccer performance, including distance covered, time spent at high intensity, number of sprints and touches of the ball during a match. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Physical Demands of Soccer: Lessons from Team USA and Ghana Matches in the 2010 FIFA WORLD CUP
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.