Ex-Quebec Student Leader, Now a Politician, Called 'Traitor' by Old Allies

By Wyatt, Nelson | The Canadian Press, February 27, 2013 | Go to article overview

Ex-Quebec Student Leader, Now a Politician, Called 'Traitor' by Old Allies


Wyatt, Nelson, The Canadian Press


Ex-student leader says he's being threatened

--

MONTREAL - A former leader within Quebec's student movement is taking flak from some of his old allies now that he's an elected politician and tuition fees are going up.

Leo Bureau-Blouin, who was elected last fall under the Parti Quebecois banner, says he's gotten threats and attacks on a Facebook page he uses to publicize a monthly meeting with constituents.

Some of the posters on the page called him a "loser" and "traitor."

Bureau-Blouin's constituency office was targeted in protests earlier this week and had red paint splattered on it during the night.

Premier Pauline Marois announced at the end of a summit on education on Tuesday that the government was rejecting calls for a tuition freeze. Instead, fees are being hiked three per cent in accordance with the cost of living.

That's about $70 per year.

Angry students, who have been fighting tuition increases for a year, took to the streets and ended up clashing with police.

More than a dozen people were arrested. Students say they plan to resume demonstrations next week.

Many vented their ire on the Facebook page, criticizing the man who was once one of the most recognizable faces of their movement.

Camille Robert, one of the spokespeople for the more militant ASSE student group, asked if Bureau-Blouin could help pay for the tuition increases.

"Would it be possible to find out if your salary as an MNA could help us pay for the increase?" she asked the 21-year-old member of Quebec's national assembly, who has already committed to donating a quarter of his salary to charity. …

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